wiring in a 3KW kiln

Page 1 of 2  
My wife has just purchased a 3KW kiln and it comes with a 13A plug. I am not too happy about connecting it via the plug.
Should I put in a 20A switch? If so, should I also put this on a spur with 2.5mm2 back to the box as the small ring main is 16A not 32A? Because it is a kiln do I need some overload protection? This is all in a small outbuilding
Finally, this is going into outbuilding with water etc etc so what is the best way of including RCD?
Thanks
--
Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2 /

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

why? what is your kettle rated at? I have a 3Kw Kettle,and your iron is probably about 2Kw. Oh, and my electric rad, that's a 3Kw one and used to get left on for hours.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ok, so maybe I am being over cautious. Kilns are famous for having new electric elements and these can vary so this might be a 3.3Kw kiln...would that change anything?
If not then I am happy with a good quality 13A plug.
Using M2, Opera's revolutionary e-mail client: http://www.opera.com/m2 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

More to the point is that, being a kiln that is on for hours at a time, there is more likelihood than with a kettle of heat running back up the cable and the plug getting hot - not something that BS1363 plugs are noted for sustaining!
Get yourself a BS4343 blue 3-pin outlet and plug. It is rated 16A, has round pins which generally give a better contact, and it means that only the kiln will be plugged into it. If you want to run a spur then you should really use 4mm cable, even though technically 2.5mm is rated.
--
Woody

snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2004 09:02:47 +0000, Woody wrote:

cable to the kiln? 16A MCB on a dedicated circuit should be OK for the flex but not if the 16A socket is wired to a ring circuit or 20A radial.
If the manufacturers supply witha 13A socket then they have taken responsibility that such an arrangement is adequate, the plug and flex will get hot but not dangerously so.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
The FAQ for uk.diy is at www.diyfaq.org.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2004 10:15:16 +0000, "Ed Sirett"

Also look for one with an RCD built in, a lot easier to fit, you just need to run a 16A radial to the RCD\socket.

Quite right, should be on a 16A radial in this instance.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2004 10:15:16 +0000, "Ed Sirett"

EN 60309 connectors (BS4343) are intended to be used on radial circuits where the protection is at the breaker, although you could put multiple ones on a single breaker if diversity can be shown.

.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It is possible that the kiln is only sucking 3kW for short periods of time, rather than all the time. In which case the 13A plug ought to do the business. That's the way a regular oven works.
I'm sure the supplier/manufacturer must be happy with the 13A plug because if they aren't then they would be laying themselves open for being sued if the arrangement catches fire etc.
PoP
If you really must use the email address provided with my newsreader please be aware that the email is processed with spamcop. As a result your email to me might be treated as spam!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PoP wrote:

What actually happens is they take a great deal of power for quite some time to bring them up to temperaure, as teh thermal mass is considerable.
THEN they go into cycle mode.
They after all, only ovens to cook ceramic in.
I still think that apart from wiring a dedicated spur, its easiest top patch in a 13A fused switched fused spur off a local ring main.
I really would not consider a 13A plug to be a suitable thing except for occasional use.

It won't catch fire. The socket will. Leastways thats been my experience of failure modes of this kind off stuff. Eventually the 13A plug/socket gets corroded, and slightly high resistance, arcing takes place, more corrosion, and heat, the plastic starts to go brittle and the thing falls apart in a shower of sparks.
You then need to replace both plug and socket. Its not unsafe, just 'accelerated ageing' really.
Why take the risk? SFS is a neat and simple way to do this. You leminate the plug and socket contact, have a dedicated bitof wire, and a switch (and proably a neon) as well as a fuse. Neat, to the point, withing regs, and less likely to fail. AND no incentive to unplug repeatedly to use socker for vacuum cleanre to sweep up the shattered vase that just fell out of the kiln..

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If there is a problem it will be obvious by the plug/socket getting very hot.
--
*Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere may be happy.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

fuse in it. Get one from one of the better manufacturers such as MK. Run a 2.5mm or 4mm radial to the consumer unit and fit a 16 or 20 amp protective device. I would also recomend fitting something like rswww.com part number 331-6493 between the fused spur unit and the consumerunit but close to the kiln. This would let you padlock the kiln off!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Scott Mills wrote:

I have had several plugs burn out eventually at these sorts of currents.
If its never going to be unplugged, I would defintely put in a switched and fused spur for it.
Why bother with a potentially unreliable plug and socket when you don't need it?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

what you're saying.
--
Chris Green

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Three Kilowatts is ok on a standard 13amp plugtop but, like anything else of that rating on that type of plugtop, it'll get a bit warm when used for hours. So don't come back in here saying that the plug is hot and everyone told you it would be OK, because it will make the plugtop warm when used for long periods of firing your pots.
--
http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The *whole* 13A plug will get hot, not just it's top. The plug's pins and fuse carrier are far more likely to be affected.
--
AJL Electronics (G6FGO) Ltd : Satellite and TV aerial systems
http://www.classicmicrocars.co.uk : http://www.ajlelectronics.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LOL !!!!! Yeaah !! You could be right. :-0
--
http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Sorry !!!! But I had to read this again. LOLLLLLL !!!!!
http://www.scolmore.com/accessories2002/30_Standard_13APlugs.html
--
http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sadly Denmans seem to use the same term. Apparently one has plugs and plug tops, rather than plugs and sockets. :-)
--
AJL Electronics (G6FGO) Ltd : Satellite and TV aerial systems
http://www.classicmicrocars.co.uk : http://www.ajlelectronics.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They're actual term is socket end, but most call them socket outlets.
--
http://www.basecuritysystems.no-ip.com

Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 10 Jan 2004, Redtag wrote:

It is pretty close to the limit for a 13A plug but they are designed to carry 3kW of power (that is why they picked 13 amps) so there should be no problem.
If the manufacturer supplies the equipment with a 13 amp plug and you chop it off and hard wire the thing via a higher rated fuse or MCB then that fuse/MCB may not trip in the event of a fault.
If you want to include RCD protection then you could install a socket outlet with RCD built in. If there is a good chance that the 16A ring main will be overloaded then to avoid nuisance tripping you should install this socket on a radial circuit back to the consumer unit, using at least 2.5mm cable and fused at 16 amps.
HTH
--
Alistair Riddell - BOFH
Microsoft - because god hates us
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.