Wireless Control of Sockets with 2KVA loads

I have a couple of Micromark remote controlled plug in MM2w3098 BSEN 730 mains switches. Unfortunately, they have 5amp fuses and are rated up to 1200W only - I have two 2.1KVA 240 to 110 volt step down transformers which I need to run. These two transformers power 1) 110V TRUE domestic treadmill and 2) 110V TRUE domestic elliptical trainer, ie only one unit per socket.
Is there anything else on the market I could use in their place? I suspect increasing the fuse to 12A would *not* be a good idea.
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David Longley

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Not fully with you on this David. (?) Isn't possible to plug the transformers directly into the 13 amp sockets ? What are you using the remote switches for ? And please don't fit higher rated fuses to equipment that is not meant to take that current. That would be very dangerous indeed. 8~(
I always thought that Micromark equipment was only rated for lighting or security installations. I've never thought of Micromark as being in the general heavy duty domestic electrical market. I'm usually wrong with this type thinking though, and I'm sure I'll be told different. :-)) Anyway, this type of thing:
<http://www.easiaids.co.uk/Catalogue/Envir_Controls/envir_controls.html
is all I can think of that would do the job I think you want to do.
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Suggestion: Why don't you simply use the controllers to operate a relay contactor sized to handle the load of the equipment. You can put the relay contacts either on the primary or secondary side of the transformer.
RFI-EMI-GUY
David Longley wrote:

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Thanks to both of you.
I'm not sure what relay contactors are, I can guess but I've not seen them commercially available. Let me elaborate. These 5am fused, 1200W rated "plugs" go into the wall socket and have a female outlet on them. They have an on/off switch and can be switched on or off by radio control remotes. These in themselves are relay-contactors presumably. I take the point that I shouldn't replace the 5A with a 13A fuse, but what I need is one of these that will handle what is, after checking, a 2KVA transformer.

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www.maplin.co.uk
stock item L23AF. radio remote controlled 13A switching.
Pack of 4 39.99
[Electrical-Home Automation -Remote Control] On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 07:30:40 +0100, David Longley

Lawrence
usenet at lklyne dt co dt uk
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Also the Timeguard (or Smiths) RA010 433Mhz RF adapter http://www.timeguard.co.uk/details.asp?product 1 I bought one in a bargain bin for 8 The device states 240v / 13a and sounds like it has relay switching. The pdf claims 3kw heating / 300w filament lighting / 100w fan loads. The website states other ratings. The helpline is 0208 450 0515
Toby.
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David Longley wrote:

They are probably solid state triacs. You might be able to stick a bigger one in, but I susepct this may overlaod other parts of teh circuitry.
You are going to have to build something - possible switched by theunist you have - that handles a bigger load, period.
Other truiacs, or contactors, are your best ebt.
Sorry, don't have any references for either right now.

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X10 appliance modules spring to mind until you mentioned the 110V transformers. The switches are rated 13A resistive load, 1A inductive load. However, I notice the most recent one I bought just says 13A on it without any indication of a reduction for inductive loads.
These units use signalling carried over the mains, but X10 can be carried over RF too, and there's a separate plug-in converter.
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It wouldn't, and I'd think you'd find it difficult to find a 12 amp fuse anyway.
Don't the makers do a suitably rated version?
It's one of those things that would be pretty easy to build using suitable relays, but would involve an extra 'box'. I'd guess size is the reason the present one is of limited current handling capability.
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What is the purpose of the switching? They seem unusual appliances to require it. The only scenario I could come up with was that you had a small quantity of equipment for a public gym, such as in a hotel that you wanted shut down during prescribed unsociable hours, or when no supervisor is available.
Assuming that you want both shut down simultaneously, I would recommend using something like a 32/40A contactor located in a suitable 1/2 way consumer unit near to the appliances feeding two single sockets (you shouldn't use a double socket if you expect the total usage of both appliances to exceed 13A). The main feed for these would be off the original (adequete) supply circuit using suitable cable (i.e. 6mm). The control line could be fed from pretty much any of the remote switches you are considering. It will be a tiny load and almost any switch will do.
Christian.
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"David Longley" wrote | I have a couple of Micromark remote controlled plug in MM2w3098 BSEN 730 | mains switches. Unfortunately, they have 5amp fuses and are rated up to | 1200W only - I have two 2.1KVA 240 to 110 volt step down transformers | which I need to run. These two transformers power 1) 110V TRUE domestic | treadmill and 2) 110V TRUE domestic elliptical trainer, ie only one unit | per socket.
Surely it is the current/power drawn by the appliances which determines the switching requirements rather than the rating of the transformers?
Owain
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On the other hand, step down transformers are available in many sizes. Larger sizes cost considerably more than smaller ones. I would hope it is fair to assume that the appliance used will not have a considerably lower VA rating than the transformer.
Christian.
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