Why does my fridge produce so much water?

A few months ago, we changed our fridge and freezer to a combined fridge-freezer. Apart from 'doing' the kitchen, one of the reasons for the change was the large amount of water produced by the fridge. It was an L.G unit, and every few weeks I had to empty the tray below the freezer compartment as it was full of water. We are talking overflowing here, maybe a pint or so. I passed it on to my mother as it was only around a year old.
Now the funny bit.
The new fridge freezer is also producing a lot of water now. Enough to overflow the tray on the back designed to evaporate it. And..my mother has had no problems with the L.G. fridge.
They were both reasonably level, not next to the cooker, not kept open unduly, and do not (often) have warm things put in them. I notice there seems to be condensation inside too.
Does anyone know what may be causing this please?
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writes

Yes, you have very moist air in your kitchen and your mother doesn't. Maybe time to open a window when cooking or get an extractor hood.
--
Tim Mitchell

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every
has
We have an extractor hood, but don't do that much cooking (gets a dig from the wife). Would the small amount of air that gets inside the fridge make that much difference?
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has
Mine does that if it's set too cold. We had it set to 3 (out of 5) in the summer but I had to turn it down to just under 1 when it got colder because of condensation and icing up at the back. Since turning it down it's been fine.
Si
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If turnign it down doesn't help, why don't you buy a cheap humidity meter to check out the moist air idea? You can get them in the gardening section of a DIY place and often they are part of a mpoisture/thermometer pair.
The scale on ours is marked to show 45-70% as the normal range. It only ever gets up to 70% in very humid weather; 50-55% is more usual, less very dry weather.
Keeping one int he kitch for a while will tell you whether humidity is unusually high there and may explain what is happening.
W.
wrote in message

Enough to

And..my mother

5) in the

colder because

it's been

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message

I may try this. The kitchen is well insulated and not cold. The funny thing is, since the first fridge, I have rebuilt and extended the kitchen to almost twice the size it was. There is pvc windows and door, insulation in the loft, and the door to our 'living room' is usually open.
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"Mungo \"two sheds\" Toadfoot" wrote

I bought a fridge thermometer. I just turn the knob to keep the guage in the 'green' range at the top of the fridge (the warmest bit). I've never turned it above 2.
Cheers,
Paul.
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to
the
because
been
We have one of these, its a 'card' which indicates the correct band. if anything, it is a little on the warm side indicated.
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someone wrote

The other possible cause of that is putting open containers in the fridge, where they continue to evaporate, the water being collected by the cooler element.
Regards, NT
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wrote:

Maybe it's your habits! Not your Cloak & Hood garb BTW!
Such as putting hot food in the fridge in an open container. or opening the fridge door a lot because of your routine. Maybe the new fridge door doesn't close properly?
BTW I've never known a fridge (or freezer) with a condensate collector that requires emptying, it's normally piped down to a dish that sits on top of the compressor where it gets evaporated. This set up fails frequently. Pipe gets blocked with slimy crud, pipe comes off, plastic dish becomes embrittled and drops to bits. USW USW.
DG
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every
has
This was my first thought. So I stoped the wife from putting hot chickens in ( ready cooked from the shop ) and checked the door seal with a paper slip. It is not open for long either.

The L.G. fridge had a tray below the 'ice shelf' part which caught the water, not sure if this was its primary function though.
The new fridg/freezer has a pipe to a sort of catch tray mounted on the compressor. presumibly this is so the heat will eveporate the water? it still overflows though.

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<<snipped>>
Is the house ventilated properly ? With the fridge in the kitchen, and all the cooking that goes on there, is the air in the room full of moisture ? Do your windows steam up a lot ? Do you remove more of your top layers of clothing when you enter the room ?
Is your wife in the habit of putting hot things straight in the fridge ? Does anyone in the house leave the fridge door open to get light at night when they take anything out the fridge ?
Place a couple of sheets of kitchen paper in the fridge, on the top shelf if possible, and see if it take up any excess moisture from the fridge compartment.
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With the fridge in the kitchen, and all

if
No to all the above, but I like the idea of soaking up the moisture. I'll try one of those super sponges in there. Thanks.
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