Which durable clear finish for old sanded-down floorboards?

OK, I have sanded down the floorboards in my 1899 house. The colour of the old pine is gorgeous... Can anyone recommend what clear finish to apply. I guess I want something good-looking, non-slip, hard-wearing and long-lasting.
Thank you!
Frank
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2003 17:05:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com ("Doc" Frank Z. Watson ) wrote:

There's only one - Rustin's Floorcoat. Not cheap, but you don't need many coats (three for a good job, two is almost good enough) and it's extremely quick to apply. You can do a whole room in a day _and_ have it dry enough to put furniture on. I've done loads of floors - won't use anything else.
On the downside, it stinks to high heaven ! Use a full face mask.
If you really want to use a varnish, then use a water-based one. The resins are much paler than the spirit-based ones.
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Andy Dingley wrote in message

total seal against liquids, even one coat works well. I brush as normal and wipe with a rag to remove the excess. A quick rub down with very fine sandpaper when dry gives you a sheen. This works well if the boards are a bit ropey and you don't want to highlight the faults.
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On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 09:35:37 +0100, "stuart noble"

It's still a floor though - people will insist on walking on it. You have to balance how well it looks on day #1 with how well it will look after some wear.
I did one about two years ago, where owing to my useless supplier (Robbins in Bristol) having removed the catalyst from the box (!) I couldn't start painting until the Monday morning, when the movers were arriving in the afternoon. I managed two coats, but not the three I would have liked. Two years on it still looks OK, but not perfect.
I've also done a bedroom with oil and wax. Now that was a lovely job, but it just had no wear resistance at all, even for a bedroom. I wouldn't do it again.
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Just done my kitchen with Rustin's 2 part. Looks superb and feels much more substantial than varnish.
Prestained the pine with 50/50 mahogany/dark oak from wickes for that authentic pub floor look.
mmmmmmm, beeeeerrrrrr
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Yes it does stink to high heaven and the face mask is vital for H&S reasons. Reminds me of a story I read, years ago, in the papers about a guy in the States who died varnishing a floor. He was found stuck, face down, to the hardened varnish on the floor; apparently he'd been overcome with fumes, passed-out, and fallen face down onto the floor. A true story & not an urban myth.
A warning to all of us about the dangers from fumes.
Paul
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I'm pretty happy with 4-5 coats of Ronseal Diamond Hard Clear Satin. Not cheap, though. We spent plenty more on varnish than we did on sander hire and sheets. Took me most of my week off to sand five rooms, but the boards are gorgeous, especially the master bedroom. Steer clear of anything solvent based, unless you are rich enough to live in a hotel for two weeks whilst the stuff dries.
Golden rule when sanding floors: DO use the fine grades. Finish off with no coarser than 100 grit, or you'll regret it.
Christian.
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