Where to get damp proofing cream?

I recently asked about the new damproofing cream. Not much response. I searched the web but not much info there.
Anyone suggest where to get info from, or missed my last question and can offer some opinions about it.
Thank you, Neil
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Niel A. Farrow wrote:

WTF is damp proofing cream? What part of the body is it applied to?
--
Grunff


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can
I think it's this stuff :
http://www.safeguardchem.com/Damp/dryzone.htm
but as far as I've seen and heard, it's garbage, and only stays local to where it is applied instead of spreading out like the thick jelly injection stuff that penetrates in to the stonework better, and can actually push out the moisture that's already there.
I've also heard of a new technique which is beginning to take over on the continent. Seemingly it consists of wedging the stonework and digging out the old mortar, then replacing it with a damp proofing mortar that is injected in to where the old mortar was removed. I think they're using it on some of the older historical buildings just now to stop any further rot taking place and still not spoil the look of the outer face of the property. If it passes all the tests, it might be something worth looking into in the future as it sounds like a good idea.
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Interesting. I'm going to propose something similar, see what you all thnik:
1. drill a hole into each brick: drill in thru the mortar, going down at an angle into each brick. 2. Fill hole with new engine oil with a little paraffin added. 3. Top up later in day. 4. Make good the mortar.
I've not tried it, but I have seen this stuff soaking easily into bits of brickwork, and it seems like it could well work on old soft bricks. Who nose.
Regards, NT
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N. Thornton wrote in message ...

On a day like today the oil would probably make its way down the wall and out on to the patio.
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What would make the oil move upwards? I cant see how it would myself.
Regards, NT
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BigWallop wrote in message <0dWXa.3963$Pi5.36437094@news-

proof
it
bad
Solvent based resins thicken or solidify when the solvent has evaporated. Oil remains fluid and gets thinner as the temperature rises so it's the last thing I'd consider for damp proofing. On a hot day with no moisture around it would migrate to the bottom of the wall. Related products like grease and wax would be a better bet, particularly some grades of microcrystalline wax that melt at around 80 degC. Used to waterproof wooden pallets I believe. I'm a great experimenter but there are some things you just know won't work.
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On 4 Aug 2003 14:04:42 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote:

What on earth makes you think parafin is going to make the bricks waterproof??? It won't.
How the real stuff works is explained in http://groups.google.com/groups?selm1dda762.87396440%40news.demon.co.uk as mentioen in a the "DIY damproof injection" thread a couple of days ago. The parafin like spirit used is merely the carrier.
-- Phil Addison The uk.d-i-y FAQ is at http://www.diyfaq.org.uk / Remove NOSPAM from address to reply
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(N. Thornton) wrote:> > Interesting. I'm going to propose something similar, see what you all

What makes you not read what youre replying to?

indeed.
Regards, NT
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injection
I installed a DPC - it wasn't jelly, looked like and smelled like white spirit - very thin.

out
The old methods in UK are : 1. use a masonry saw - cut 12- 18" sectiuons and insert a new DPM 2. electro osmosis - run an earth wire around, and ground it well (only used inside to my knowledge) 3. drill and insert at an angle porous ceramic tubes - allows water to leach out under hydrostatic pressure - think this has discontinued in use.
Rick
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"N. Thornton" wrote:

Upwards? Well, oil floats on water, so when damp in the wall rises, the oil will go up. Worse, as the oil goes up, the water will follow, or else there'd be a vacuum in your brick wall, which would make the bricks implode, and your house would fall down! In a heavy fall of rain, the soaking effect might force the oil up so fast that it could spout out of your chimney pot, like an old "gusher" (oil well). This could be dangerous if you've a fire going, or the neighbours have forgoten to bring their washing in.
I should forget about the possibility of using an injected oil damp-proof course as soon as possible!
Erm... anyway, damp courses are above ground...
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not at all what happens.

Amusing yes, but convincing no.

I know you would, but not based on any reason here. The one good reason to avoid them is that we dont know if they work or not, but I would be interested to find out. Having used oil soaking as water penetration prevention elsewhere I know it is most effective, and I know it soaks nicely into old soft bricks, so I'm certainly curious.

Yes...
Regards, NT
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