What tool?

Page 1 of 2  
Hello All
I have (waves arms) about 10m2 of concrete that's 2-4" thick. I need to get rid of it so I can lay some decent paving without going about the DPC of the house.
I was wondering, would a biggist cheap SDS drill do this? (I'm thinking of the 2kg 40 quid Ferm jobbies in Screwfix). Even if that takes a bit longer than a hired breaker I'd be happy as I'd have another tool at the end of it, but would it actually do the job?
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
uk.d-i-y FAQ: http://www.diyfaq.org.uk /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
the easiest thing to break concrete at 2-3 inches is a sledge hammer. Once you have the edge broken it goes very quickly. At 3-4 inches you may well find that you need to hire a heavy breaker. Your SDS drill will not do it. You may well buy a new one then use it and it may break to start with but I am sure that by the end you will need a new SDS drill as it will have worn out
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Or a pickaxe, I reckon the more concentrated impact from a pick starts cracks better, and you can alternate between thumping and levering.
But I agree with the others, this is a Kango job
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nah a sledgehammer
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Simon Avery wrote:

Don't bother with a cheapo SDS Simon, it'll die long before that job is done. Yes it'll be under warranty, but that's another trip to the shop etc.
As AndyM said, hire a kango for 20 - should make a very quick job of it.
If you want an SDS, spend 100 on a DeWalt 566 - you won't regret it. But I still wouldn't want to do that area with it, takes too long.
--
Grunff


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hello Grunff

Yeah, and I've already got a few cheap tools that expired but I never got around to taking 'em back.

Gotya, and thanks for all the replies. I'll do that over a weekend soon. (Got me little trailer to refurb first though)

Understood. I don't really have a need at the moment for one, and the bosche 20 quid normal drill I bought 7 years ago is still doing a good enough job for me.
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
uk.d-i-y FAQ: http://www.diyfaq.org.uk /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 7 Jul 2003 18:04:26 +0100, wanderer wrote:

Quite. two people, one long crowbar and a sledge hammer. Once you have got under an edge(*) just prise it up a few inches and whack it with the sledge, at a point where it has no support underneath. Concrete is excellent in compression but next to useless in tension, thats why you have to put reenforcement into it for areas that are in tension.
(*) That might be the bit you need a power breaker for but a cold chisel an lump hammer will do.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Don't forget, it's much easier to break if you can undermine it (i.e. remove whatever is underneath it)
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you can get underneath it then one good way of breaking up the concrete block is to light a fire underneath, then sit back and wait.
That's one of the methods that they used in days gone by to bring down the walls of a fortress - dig a hole beneath the castle wall, fill it with firewood, set it alight, then have a party whilst the castle dwellers shat themselves knowing what was going to happen.
Andrew
Do you need a handyman service? Check out our web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You do need to have a large stone tower on top of it for this to work though. The bit you missed out is that, as they dug under the defences, the miners put in a large number of very heavy wooden supports, to stop the tower falling down on top of them. The fire was to burn the wood away, allowing the tower to fall under its own weight. Fred Dibnah demonstrated this technique on TV, when he was demolishing a building. He also demonstrated how difficult it is to know just when the timber is about to give way and ended up running off the site as bits of masonry started to fall.
Colin Bignell
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 8 Jul 2003 08:34:12 +0100, <nightjar> wrote:

You may be correct - but that's not entirely the way I understood it.
Yes, for sure you need to prop up the structure above. But the damage to the concrete comes about because the concrete gets some localised heat which it doesn't dissipate very well. And it can't expand and contract like (for example) a piece of metal. And so it shatters.
However I'm happy to accept that I could be wrong.
Andrew
Do you need a handyman service? Check out our web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, so the defenders could attack the miners before the mine got under the walls. Since they were cutting through rock the defenders eventually found them by sound. The castle was eventually taken when some French warships arrived off the coast and bombarded it. This was during the religious strife during the reformation when Mary Queen of Scots was very young and there was a series of regents.
Peter
--
Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dave Liquorice wrote:

True, but use a digger. Then you won't have to carry all the bits into the skip.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hello wanderer

Yeah, but you've seen where she keeps her muscles...
I tried it with a bar, nothing doing. It's not a nice big flat slab you can get underneath, it's a 4' wide strip between two buildings, including a large haunch to one.
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
uk.d-i-y FAQ: http://www.diyfaq.org.uk /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Simon Avery wrote:

Ah. Barely enough room for a minidigger then.
Kanga, and mini digger if it will get in teh space.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 09 Jul 2003 13:35:46 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

Ding! Ding! Ding!
You mentioned a magic word. I'm seriously looking at a trailer option presently, but haven't got further than noticing trailers for sale in the entrance to the local B&Q shed (and no, I'm not considering buying one but it got me thinking....).
Can you offer any useful snippets about what trailer or trailer bits are worth looking at?
My needs are simple - I want something relatively small, say 4ft square, which I can toss rubbish into for taking down the dump.
Andrew
Do you need a handyman service? Check out our web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a colleague bought one of those a while ago and seems happy with it.
Peter
--
Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Hello Andrew

I'll have a 99 please!

They little galvanised things? They look ok for light work, but a few careless stones will mean they will soon get dented, bashed and start to rust. Not sure about their weight abilities, but that shouldn't be an issue for you.

Then the cheapie B&Q ones may well do the job. I don't know of any cheaper options, unless you happen to own a welder and have a spare axle knocking about. Grab some thin blue polyprop rope too if you're doing bulky rubbish, small trailers bounce quite well. They are lightweight so won't stand abuse, but look after them and they should be ok. Trailer specilist places may be worth a look, but IME they tend to be overpriced, especially for spares and accessories. My local one also has the same trailer (A Caddy, iirc) that B&Q does but 50 quid dearer. If it doesn't have a jockey wheel, be aware you prolly won't be able to unhitch it loaded, but they're dead easy to move around when empty.
PLEASE practice your reversing if you've not towed a trailer before, or at least stay out of the lanes! (Bane of my life, trailer drivers who can't reverse). The smaller the trailer the harder it is to reverse.
Check your licence. Towing rules changed ~96 so if your licence was gained after that you may need a seperate test (or not, it's complicated - I can get you some info if this is the case).
I've got four trailers now, but my little one is what I've just finished refurbing for the fourth time (had it 16 years or so, exchanged it rotted for a couple of hours work). 6'x4', 1/2 tonne or so. Home built and uses the back axle off a Vauxhall Viva, complete with drive shaft that's been collared and welded up to the chassis. Useful size, small enough for my lawnmower, big enough so it's usable. Hopefully this 18mm wpb ply, with four coats of bitumastic emulsion, should last a good few years.
--
Simon Avery, Dartmoor, UK
uk.d-i-y FAQ: http://www.diyfaq.org.uk /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 11 Jul 2003 15:50:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote:

That's a concern for me, not having towed anything before. Thanks for the tip.

I passed in c. 1976 so I should be okay.
I also passed my motorbike test a couple of years earlier than that, so can ride any two wheeled chariot, none of this poncing around with tests and limits for me. However you wouldn't get me back on two wheels now for love nor money - way too dangerous!
Thanks for the info, much appreciated.
Andrew
Do you need a handyman service? Check out our web site at http://www.handymac.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

But you've got mares with much bigger muscles than her Simon. Can't you get a few of them round to do the job...
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.