What are Dremels for?

Page 3 of 5  
IMM wrote:

Not really: I don't think there ARE any decent RAS available to the DIY market anymore. Sure DeWalt make some, but they are more pro-scale machines. Nyself, I prefer a table saw and an SCMS, but I liked the DeWalt RAS.
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I used to have access to a DW 3 phase radial arm saw built in to a custom made workbench about 10 ft either side of it. I *really* loved that set up. It could cope with anything I ever wanted to do.
--
*Also too, never, ever use repetitive redundancies *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For me it depends on the type of tool.
Some (many?) hand tools can last just about for ever, especially with light DIY use - such things as spanners, squares, planes etc.
Some other hand tools inevitably wear out - screwdrivers (especially cross point ones), files, etc.
Similarly with power tools, some I would expect to last a (very) long time - e.g. pillar drills, table saws, etc. On the other hand I do regard cordless drills and such as expendable. Apart from anything else (at least at the moment) technology improves at such a rate that it's worth buying a new one every so often to see how much better it is than a five year old one.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've still got my very first B&D drill - bought from Shoppertunities in the early '60s. It's had one gearbox repair, and a complete overhaul at the B&D factory in the '70s. After that it was kept in a drill stand for 'accurate' work, as I'd got a hammer drill for general stuff by then.
--
*I have plenty of talent and vision. I just don't care.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Damn, you beat me. I also still have my very first B&D drill. It was an Xmas present from my parents in 1975. These days it's the standby/spare.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
[email me at huge [at] huge [dot] org [dot] uk]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 24 Dec 2003 11:55:48 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

I still have my very first hand drill (a Stanley). Bought as part of a toolkit for my 14th birthday in 1964.
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've got several power tools which are now standbys. In some ways, it would be nice if they'd failed so could be chucked out. ;-)
My oldest 'tool set' is a hex drive Britool socket set bought as an 17th birthday present. Don't use it much as there's no metric sockets.
--
*Avoid clichs like the plague. (They're old hat.) *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not there isn't, and it's widely done with volume distributed, low cost products.

Of their own label PPPro product, I agree, because I am sure the warranty is tied to market analysis and acceptable return rates on faulty product, and anything over these limits charged back to the contract manufacturer.
I do think that the store should be required to make their service policy clear, however.

For this type of product I agree - that is the pragmatic approach. I wonder, though, whether a lot of people, attracted by low prices and long warranties confuse it with quality and don't realise that there is no repair path.

True, but then that depends on the activity level of the DIYer. It also makes a fixed time period warranty even more unreasonable. Generally with tools there are four classes of things that go wrong:
- Manufacturing defects - Consumable items like brushes - Items that get a bashing in use and need to be replaced - e.g. guards etc. - Items that wear
The warranty is only likely to cover one of those - manufacturing defects.
If one could buy spares for or have tools sold on this basis repaired, then the economics would make sense.
It seems much more sensible to me to pay more for a tool that is going to be better quality in the first place in terms of the quality of work that can be achieved, more comfortable to use, likely to have a longer life before needing repair and can be repaired when required.
By the time that return visits to the store are taken into account, I suspect that in most cases, over a few years the total cost of ownership is going to be less as well.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Price/performance again. I have had Bosch drills clap out on me, They are repairable. The cost of repair was just not worth it, in the bin it went. I may as well have bought a 3 yr guarantee PP Pro (but they weren't available then). Now I assess them.
I know people who rent out flats. they buy Miele's, they buy 200 Candy's and the likes, and if out of guarantee they clap out they buy another. They have a washing machine up and running very soon a one year guarantee (2 years with John Lewis) and a satisfied tenant who thinks the landlord is brill by giving them a brand new machine. It all makes sense.
I know one who 9/10 replaces the sink top with new one and a new mixer each time he re-lets. These can be had for about 40-40. It take 1/2 hour to fit using the flexible pipes underneath to replace. A new shiny sink impresses potential tenants.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.552 / Virus Database: 344 - Release Date: 15/12/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Absolutely.
On a significant tool purchase, I always look up the major spare parts costs.

What is there to assess? They're cheap, they're junk, there's no support and you toss them.

for a rented flat?

For a washing machine for a rented flat where people may not take care of the item anyway then it may well make sense.
For a quality power tool to produce good quality work in the hands of someone who will take care of it the equation is completely different.

Good for him, but it is not related to cheap throwaway power tools.

.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ooh, right between the shoulder blades
--
geoff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Maxie. It was?
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.552 / Virus Database: 344 - Release Date: 15/12/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just how often does the average DIY tool require repair? I'd say it's pretty rare if it's being used for the purpose intended.
--
*Don't squat with your spurs on *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use a jigsaw with a blade broken down to a suitable length.
--
*How much deeper would the oceans be without sponges? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
PoP wrote in message ...

But so is a 3 plasterboard saw, with a lot less dust.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Rotozips are brilliant at cutting holes in tiles while on the wall.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.552 / Virus Database: 344 - Release Date: 15/12/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have the Axminster white "Dremel-alike" with the flexi-shaft. It's rubbish. When I have the money, I'll buy a Foredom.
I've rarely "started a job with the Dremel". Even more rarely have I used it succesfully. Very frequently though, I've used it for some impossible task that was simply impossible by any other means. I wouldn't rush out and buy one the same day if I lost it, but I do find that it earns its keep. I only ever use it with the flexi-shaft. As a general rule, it's good as a crude tool and a failure for anything accurate.
Recent jobs:
Polishing out a scratched mirror.
Sawing (abrasive disk) the needle shaft in a pressure gauge, without bending the shaft.
Sawing (abrasive disk) the throttle butterfly spindle out of my car, working from inside the inlet manifold.
Grinding edges on stained glass.
Dismantling a lock barrel by grinding through an internal circlip.
General carving with an oval carbide burr.
Failures:
Polishing trigger sears (a disaster - had to do it by hand again afterwards, using a flat stone)
Carving a wax seal from soapstone (too much vibration, owing to poor bearings)
Engraving serial numbers (a tenner's worth of cheap engraver works much better)
Anything with carbide burrs (the Axminster's crappy chuck won't grip carbide)
Sawing a narrow slot in oak - not enough torque.
Drilling. Drills this size are too fragile.
The carving head for the Axminster. Head works, chisels are made of cheese. Maybe I'll try the Flexcut ones for it.
-- Smert' spamionam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If you get one, don't use it for dental work.
I thought the polishing head would be great for getting a stain off a tooth. I very rapidly realised why dentists have that squirty water thing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I knew this group was eclectic, but d-i-y dentistry?
mike r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in> > If you get one, don't use it for dental work.

And dont use araldite for fillings either. Last case I heard of that the chap was getting a tumour removed from his jawbone where he'd done the filling. Ouch. I guess its not meant for that after all.
Wish I could do me own teeth ;)
Regards, NT
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.