Wax

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Last night the Mother In Law dripped hot candle wax on to the front of my TEAC floor standing speakers. The fronts come off and the material is like 'thick stockings'. Anybody got any ideas on how to remove it without damaging the material. I did think a hairdryer but the heat may be too fierce, or hot water, does anybody know the melting point of candle wax?
TIA
John
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Try hard freezing that should make it more brittle,melting does not sound a good ides to me,if it does not work on the covers, it will definately work on the mother in law
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off using absorbant paper
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from "Chris Oates" <none> contains these words:

Be very careful if you choose this method! I managed to burn part of my sitting room carpet, while attempting to remove candle wax!
--
AnneJ
ICQ:- 119531282
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Chris Oates wrote:

Yeah, and I've got patches of stripped varnish on the dining table from doing this last year.
Solvent is an alternative on surfaces that can't take heat.

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Careful with this too. Today my 3 yr old got nail varnish on a polished side table. As she isn't allowed nail polish on her own and is a very resourceful kid and a sneaky wee git, she swiped nail polish remover and proceeded to remove nail polish and table varnish right back to bare wood. The damn nail polish is crap at remove nail polish too! Looks like a job for the professionals :(
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Suz wrote:

Yes. Acetone/Xylene will attack many varnishes, but not polyurethanes.
Actually, you may find that a thorough dousing of the whole table with nail varnish remover followed by a rub over with a scrap cloth will at least get the surface even, and then another layer of some suitable varnish will restore it well.

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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

The standard way to get it off clothing is to use a warm iron with brown paper between the clothing and iron. The iron melts the wax - which is then absorbed by the brown paper. It *might* work with speaker fronts - but only if can support them adequately on a flat surface. [I assume that there's some sort of frame which would prevent the fabric from going down flat onto an ironing board?] Maybe you could put a folded towel or something similar underneath it.
--
Cheers,
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the standard way to get wax out of material is to cover the waxed area with brown paper and iron on top of it, the melted wax will be absorbed by the brown paper. but i'm not sure i would risk that on my speaker fronts. maybe use lots of layers of paper and a low iron setting.
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Just to issue a note of caution about this ironing out wax idea. I tried it with my carpet and stuck the iron to the carpet. I moved the sofa forward to cover the melted bit (in the shape of a hotplate) but the iron went in the bin. Just be careful!
john
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VERY good point, i have done the same myself but had, until now, forgotten
make sure all surrounding surfaces are covered and that the iron never comes into direct contact with your speaker front!

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It was incredibly stupid of me I know and I haven't lit a candle in the many years since but... The reason I was trying to get wax out of the carpet was because I put a candle in one of those little /plastic/ jugs you use to fill an iron with water. I don't know what I was thinking. I went into the kitchen to talk to my mate. After a bit I noticed I could smell burning plastic. It took a few seconds for me to realise. Racing back into the living room I found that the plastic jug had gone up in flames along with the antique, veneered wooden display cabinet it was stood on. I managed to put the flames out but there's now a large burnt area on the top of the cabinet and the wax and plastic has ran down the front, leaving a mark. It was a family piece of furniture that had been entrusted to my care, so I had some explaining to do.
Moral - be extra, extra careful with candles!
john
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Sneezy wrote:

I know it's against the spirit of DIY, but... a French polisher will be able to sort that out. If you're anywhere near Essex I can recommend a superb bloke, who has worked miracles on a couple of pieces of mine.
--
Ben Blaney
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It needs a few new layers of veneer, then a polish. I just put a stack of paperwork over it :) I guess some day I'll be brave and find out the cost. Not that I can afford anything at the mo.
john (in Leeds - city, not village)
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A man I know did exactly the same thing. I'm very pleased about it because up to now you'd think it was only women who had accidents with candles!

As a (beeswax) candle maker I'd endorse that but they really aren't dangerous in themselves - only when abused. The only accident I've had with a candle - in a long life - was when I allowed one to burn right down in a wooden candleholder. The smell of burning wood alerted me. You only do something like that once.
I still use the candleholder.
Mary

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Mary Fisher wrote:

You only do something like that once. That has an ominous ring.
Frankly I think candles are carcinogenic and extremely dangerous to have in a house. SWMBO has spilt wax all over a table, ruining it using an iron to get it out, all over a brand new tablecloth that won't wash out, all down a period brick wall, and, hasn't quite managed to set the kittens alight, but there is still time.
Open fires come under serious building regulations. You can't buy fireworks easily and there are steps to ban them, but candles - oh you can have a merry Xmas setting fire to your house with no goverment health warnings and no instructions at all.

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I've never heard that one before. Do you have any evidence for this that I can wave under the nose of my candlephile SWMBO?
(You have to admit they're fun to play with at the dinner table though...)
David
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"Mary Fisher" wrote | "Sneezy" wrote | > Moral - be extra, extra careful with candles! | As a (beeswax) candle maker I'd endorse that but they really aren't | dangerous in themselves - only when abused.
As it seems that candles, electricity generation and distribution resiliency, and emergency lighting, are currently or fairly recently popular topics of conversation here:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/3362555.stm Investigators have been trying to find out what caused a fire which killed a woman and her grandchild. The fire broke out at 60-year-old Ellen Simpson's cottage in Wanlockhead, Dumfries and Galloway, at 0400 GMT on New Year's Day. The woman and her 13-year-old granddaughter, who was staying there with her mother, died. One theory is that candles being used during a power cut may have been the source of the blaze.
Owain
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"Mary Fisher" wrote | "Sneezy" wrote | > Moral - be extra, extra careful with candles! | As a (beeswax) candle maker I'd endorse that but they really aren't | dangerous in themselves - only when abused.
As it seems that candles, electricity generation and distribution resiliency, and emergency lighting, are currently or fairly recently popular topics of conversation here:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/3362555.stm Investigators have been trying to find out what caused a fire which killed a woman and her grandchild. The fire broke out at 60-year-old Ellen Simpson's cottage in Wanlockhead, Dumfries and Galloway, at 0400 GMT on New Year's Day. The woman and her 13-year-old granddaughter, who was staying there with her mother, died. One theory is that candles being used during a power cut may have been the source of the blaze.
Owain
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Theory.
But I still maintain that a candle, of itself, is an innocuous item.
To cause any problem the wick has to be lit.
Then the candle has to be placed near something flammable, or not fixed in a proper holder, or caried about without due care, or left in a draught or ...
I repeat that candles aren't | dangerous in themselves - only when abused. And who causes the abuse?
People.
Blame people for such accidents.
The oxygen in the air can't be blamed for the fire in the factory.
Mary

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