Water damaged chipboard

Putting in new en-suite
Removed tiles, sink, shower &* carpet.
some of the chipboard flooring is water damaged. I can remove and replace most of it, but about 6 inches of board comes under the stud wall. The wall runs parallel to the joists, roughly halfway between two joists. If I cut the chipboard back to the wall, the chipboard under the wall will be unsupported.
Is there any risk of the wall using the chipboard for support? (the en-suite was added at the same time as a bedroom extension - before we had the house.)
If I cut back the board, is there any (easy?) way of getting support under the wall?
Alternatively is there any sealant I can get which will soak into the chipboard and stabilise it (the water damage in this area is not too bad.)
Finally - what is the best way of protecting the floor from water damage in the future (I will be fitting aqualoc laminate flooring with a water proof underlay - I could try running that up the walls a bit.)
Thanks all.
--
Tony Collins





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"Tony Collins" <reply_to_group> wrote in message

yes. In most cases it wont but yes it can do sometimes.

I dont see how one could comment without seeing the job.

Interesting. There is wood hardener, I really have no idea if it would help or not.

The best approach is to fit a floor that doesn't mind getting wet. Chipboard is unsuitable for a bathroom. Strips of wood half wrapped in wet retaining plastic would also seem to be be a poor choice, especially when those strips are thinner bits glued together, ie laminate. Concrete and lino or bathroom carpet are much better, and if you have some ventilation underneath, then lino over wood is normally fine too.
Regards, NT
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Eeurgh!
I think bathroom carpet is a disgusting idea. You might as well make a floor from used toilet paper. Probably more hygenic and less smelly.
Christian.
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There *SHOULD* be a joist under the wall. You will probably find that the chipboard is between the joist and the wall.
You may like to check if the wall is damaged. I would cut a hole in the floor, and using a shaving mirror and tourh, have a bit of a poke arround.
Rick
On Sun, 2 Nov 2003 22:35:00 -0000, "Tony Collins" <reply_to_group> wrote:

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wrote:

Surely not
All my non-load bearing walls lay parallel and in-between the joist runs.
When i completely ripped up my through lounge floor i supported all ends that were not in the immediate vicinity of an existing noggin with fresh noggins
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Yes, there is a big difference between SHOULD and ARE when it comes to buildings...
Christian.
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On Tue, 4 Nov 2003 10:48:08 -0000, "Christian McArdle"

standard for the whole area around where i live, all 1930's semis, mostly stevens 'construct' - i use that term loosely as they bodged quite a few things.
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