Warm air heating

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Hi I'm thinking of moving house soon and one of the prospective houses I'm interested in has warm air heating (fairly new house). Are there any known probs with these systems, are they reliable, are parts easy to obtain. etc etc Any thoughts or suggestions greatly appreciated Jim PS Also, do these systems provide domestic hot water as well?
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A fairly new house with warm air heating.... Thought that was a 70's thing, well from my experience they produce a very dry dusty heat, you can be boiling hot near the outlets but freezing cold at the other side of the room, don't know of any probs specifically with them tho.

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Jim Crow wrote:

The biggest problem is that prospective buyers will have doubts about it when you come to sell, just like you do. We replaced ours with conventional rads a while ago because we were extending and it wasn't extendable. You definitely want Mod AirFlow (assuming Johnson&Starley) or an equivalent variable fan-speed system. As it's a modern house this is probably standard. Ours had a separate gravity-fed "Janus" heater and primatic DHW cylinder, also very 70's. Plusses are that it's very reliable; there's nothing to rust or leak. Also the house heats up very quickly and you don't lose wallspace to radiators. J&S spares should be no problem - don't know about other makes. Minuses -yes it's dry,dusty and a bit noisy. Also you'll probably find large gaps at the top and bottom of all doors, and you have to clean the dust filter regularly.
--
Laurie R



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Laurie R Wrote:

warm air units are on the way out.....would not recommend one.....the have serious safety issues and are expensive to install...
-- gastec
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says... <snip>

to say that they blow carbon monoxide all over the house, or that flames will come shooting out of the vents ...
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He will.
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Rob Morley Wrote:

yes the older models could pump c/o around the house....less and les gas engineers are requalifying to work on warm air as there is no mone in it...the goverment is pushing to stop the sales of less efficiant c/ systems and this is putting the final nail in the coffin for war air....however there are folks that like warm air...its possible t intall a wet ch boiler that sources heat to a warm air unit via special heat exchanger...expensive and Ive never saw one installed i the uk .
-- gastec
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On Mon, 7 Nov 2005 23:09:52 +0000, gastec wrote:

Odd. I have a CH boiler feeding half a dozen fan convectors...
That is how you do it hese days.
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wrote:

.. and indeed for at least the last 25 years.
--

.andy


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located indoor fan and heat exchanger serving the ducting distribution is not uncommon on my patch. (Afos is the make which jumps to mind)
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conditioning.
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On Wed, 9 Nov 2005 01:40:25 -0000, Rob Morley wrote:

That is true: Where Aircon does go in these days its more about recirculationg and cooling air with refrigerating cassettes rather than full aircon.
Personally a fully modern house could and maybe should have very tightly controlled ventialtion and heating: Like Drivel always goes on about...but the cost of doing it with no standard off the shelf bits tends to exceed the cost of simply shoving in a bit of air cooling in summer...
At some level its all a compromise. My hot air blowers cold indeed have cold water going through them - sloightly refrigerated water - in summer...but he danger would then be condensation...
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says...

All parts off-the-shelf.

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says...

a/c is not needed in the UK
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Neither is heating, then. Depends on whether you like comfortable temperatures at all times.
--
*If a pig loses its voice, is it disgruntled? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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flatulence wrote in message wrote:

It is needed, unless the house is superinsulated, and built to passive solar principles.

With adequate design, insulation, thermal mass (this helps) and ventilation a/c is not required at all.
** snip senility **
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Only if the heat exchangers was holed. And as the modern exchangers are stainless steel highly unlikely.

A service call is a service call. The gas controls are the same as boiler controls.

Total bollocks!!! There are some highly efficient warm air systems. J&S have a condensing box that fits in a conventional flue adding efficiency.

I have seen lots. Whole housing estates and tower blocks had Copperads fitted. There are copper coil air handling units around, heated by boilers which heat the cylinders too.
You really should find out something about forced air before you prattle tripe.
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On 7 Nov,

Only if you manage to burn a hole in a substantial heat exchanger. Mine was as good as new when removed after 15 years service (was no longer large enough due to extensions)

Bodge the builder (with the helicopter) loked them (for the cheapness)

A whole estate near here was fitted with those by the builder. Upstairs rooms were fitted with conventional radiators. The big advantage of these over the dry system was that the fans could be modulated to give a constant output, with lower noise levels.
--
B Thumbs
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gastec wrote: ...its possible to

It's how air handling units heat air (other than electric or heat pump jobs). There must be many hundreds of thousands of them, you can't get out much.
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Good systems.

No.
Yes
Johnson ad Starley provide all parts. Most of the gas parts are common boiler controls.

Keep with it.

Some may have a gas circulator in the same casing to heat the hot water.

Adapt it to bring in fresh air. Then it is a forced air ventilation system. They also cool in summer by drawing in cooler outside air.

You can have a split system air/rads. most are extendable. It is just dutwork.

Yep.
Can be on a quick recovery coil cylinder. The Janus is very reliable.

Yep.
Yep.
Only J&S unless you go American. Lennox are available in the UK.

A humidifier (spinner) can easily be installed, an controlled via a humidistat.

Electrostatic air filters are available that are recommend for asthmatics.

New units are very quiet, also the cupboard can be further soundproofed quite easily.

Electrostatic filters have a dust trap.
Mr Gastec writes:

Oh this idiot again. There are no safety issues with warm units in any way whatsoever. Are you corgi registered? How do you make a living!
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