Victorian fireplace question

I have a firplace dating from around 1880 which has a nice wooden mantel and surround, but the inner part needs replacing as its tiles (it is fully tiled inside the surround) are in a poor state. Is there anywhere I can buy a readymade insert to replace it? Or anywhere that does them made to measure? I could get it retiled I suppose - do you have to get special heat resistant ones? I am not certain whether the existing tiles are original or not.
Mike
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On Thu, 27 Nov 2003 21:30:40 -0000, "Mike Jones"

Any architectural salvage yard will have a selection of tiles, odd tiles that might repair a set you already have, and cast iron fireplaces.
If you want something more unusual, a smith who fabricates architectural steelwork can build you a fireplace however you might want it.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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and
tiled
measure?
resistant
I put 'tiles victorian reproduction' in Google and found a number of interesting sites.
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and
tiled
measure?
resistant
This dosnt sound much like a Victorian fire place to me - fully tiled fireplaces as you describe started to appear in the Arts & Crafts movement 1920 and remained popular through till the 70s. Most Victorian fireplaces were made of cast iron. Some had tiles down each side (around 5 per side) some did not. Have you got a pic ?
The tiles in a Victorian cast iron fire place can be easily changed and original tiles are readily availiable from antique shops and reclamation yards. Modern repros are also availiable but will cost just as much so may as well go for proper ones IMO.
With the cast iron insert removed youll see that the tiles are held in place usually by a sort of cast iron frame which attaches to the insert and some lime based mortar of some description. The frame bit may have rotted away it seems to be one of the first things to go. The new tiles can be "cemented" in place using bonding plaster.
Cast iron inserts are availiable in antique shops and reclamation yards - expect to pay around 350GBP for a cast iron insert and around 70GBP for the tiles.
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It is NOT fully tiled - the mantel and sides are very nice wood. As I said, it is the insert I am talking about. there is no iron, it is just tiled. I wonder if the insert tiling was done in the 20s or 30s or later??? I thought tiles in cast iron was an Edwardian thing not Victorian. My house is about 1880. Mike
Thanks for the help so far, guys. I'll try to get a photo.

may
place
the
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said,
house
Fully tiled inserts were a 20th century thing - im sure. Tiles in cast iron were a Victorian thing but did continue into Edwardian era. Later ones tended to have simpler desings on the tiles (or sometimes just a plain colured tile). Have a look at this link, theres a few styles available here.
http://www.c20fires.co.uk/fireplaces/original_inserts/index.htm
Just cos your house is 1880 dosnt mean that previous occupants didnt succome to the latest craze and rip out the original fireplace. One of ours in our 1850's house was a 1960's/70's tiled fireplace.
Still like to see a piccie.
Andy
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Thanks for that web site Andy - I've done a bit of research and I reckon they kept the wooden surrounds and replaced the cast iron middles with (twenties?) Arts & Crafts style tyling. I might try and sell the inserts and restore them to Victorian cast iron varieties - I'll keep the surrounds obviously. Mike

iron
succome
our
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