Varnishing over Paint

I've been repainting my kitchen cupboard doors using dulux satinwood, since none of the kitchen makeover paints were available in the colour I wanted.
To give a hardwearing, washable finish, I thought I should then add a few coats of varnish. However, the varnish leaves a patchy, grubby-looking finish (even when using brand new brushes) which makes me wonder whether it is incompatible with the paint below.
Does anyone know if this is likely to be the problem, and more to the point, what kind of varnish I should be using?
Thanks
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (Bob) wrote:

Are you mixing water and solvent based finishes? Max Bone once pointed out to me that this is not a problem but you do need to wait several days between the different finishes.
Alternatively what sort of varnish are you using? If it is polyurethane then you may need to sand the paint to roughen it slightly to give the poly some grip.
Peter
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(Bob) wrote:

It is a polyurethane varnish (Ronseal clear satin varnish), but the problem is not one of adhesion. The cupboard doors are painted a pale yellow, but the varnish makes them look dirty.
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (Bob) wrote:

There was a thread a while ago about protecting a painting outside where various crystal varnishes were referenced. I suspect that is what you need and that the Ronseal is not as clear as it might be. IIRC you need a crystal or blond varnish if you really want to cover such a light colour with no tint. Unlikely to be cheap though, its probably best to just paint them but be resigned to touchups now and again. Slightly more work maybe but less heartache.
Peter
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We did the same about 4 years ago.

I didn't bother though I thought about it, the finish is wearing well, no problem keeping it clean

What are you using now?
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Varnish is for bare wood or stained wood,not oil based gloss surfaces.
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Not true,
Some gloss oil paints (Tekaloid) actually recommend varnishing with a linseed oil varnish.
Steve.
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Wonder if Constable knew this? ;-)
Never heard of coach painting?
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (Bob) wrote:

What varnish are you using, If water base then you'll get much better results using either an oil or a polyurathane base varnish.

Personally I'd use an oil based varnish, But I would say that :)
Steve.
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(Bob) wrote:

It's a polyurathane varnish, but even using clean, new brushes, the finish looks dirty. The nice light creamy yellow finish of the satinwood paint looks as if it has been covered with dirty dishwater. The doors now look as if they were painted ten years ago!
I figured it must be something to do with the varnish (and it can't be just this pot, because I knocked it over and had buy another one!).
Bob
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(Bob) wrote:

Try Polyvines water-bourne Varnish it won't affect the colour, key on with a light sanding first (sounds like you will have to sand to get rid of the old varnish anyway) and use a water based Eggshell paint next time.
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snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (Bob) wrote:
[snip]

Sounds to me like you have a poor (so called clear) varnish where the thickness of the brushed out varnish is showing as coloured streaks.
As a clarity guide when observed in the tin, Does the varnish have a distinct colour shade?, It really should be totally clear like water if it is of the true clear varnish type.
Steve.
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