Using wall units on floor!

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Sorry if this is a dumb question, but apart from having to fit legs, is there any reason why tall kitchen wall units couldn't be used as base units? The depth of these would be ideal for what I want.
Thanks, Tony
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Tony Hayes wrote on Thursday (22/01/2004) :

The design of the structure of wall units is slightly different, making them more suitable for wall mounting than floor mounting.
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Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Really? My wall units are constructed in an almost identical way to my floor units (MFI, 2 years old). Same thickness board, same fixings. The only significant difference is the lack of top panels on the floor units.
I don't think there'd be any problem at all with using wall units on the floor.
--
Grunff

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I was looking at B&Q ones the other day for somebody who was refurbishing a kitchen. Wall units have the thin rear panel quite close to the back - maybe 20mm in, whereas floor units have it a bit further forward - maybe 75mm and probably in order to take pipes as well as cables or even wastes.
There are small slots cut out of the rear panel to accommodate the hangers.
Apart from that, the only issue is the legs and you can buy those separately anyway. The unit heights on these carcases were 720mm for both types and they fit together in the same way.
.andy
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wrote:

Depending exactly what is required of them you could use the hangars, and not bother with legs.
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On 23 Jan 2004 04:09:40 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@sheerstock.fsnet.co.uk (Andrew) wrote:

True, although have you lifted a worktop lately? Assuming once is involved in this application, of course. .andy
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In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

I can't really see a problem.
Does Tony mean that if they're not 100% rigid, when you hang them on the wall by their top, the weight will keep them square. But if you stand them on the floor, they just might lozenge a bit?
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Set Square
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units?
I've done it before with no ill effects. As long as they are the same height as the floor cabinets which ISTR not all / many ranges were when I looked?
Another Tony
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units?
No reason at all why you can't. We've done just that and it gives us some valuable extra storage space without encroaching into the room too much. In fact we hadn't thought about it until we went into MFI and they had done just that in one of their displays. Use adjustable legs (we have some nice brushed steel ones that screw up and down) to get the top of the unit inline with the standard base units.
Phil
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On 22/01/2004 Phil a wrote :

OK, lets look at the structure. You have a bottom shelf, to which you would be fixing the legs, which is lightly fixed to the sides and perhaps the back. This panel fits in between the sides, so any heavy load placed upon the unit, will rely entirely upon the very delicate fixings of this bottom panel to the rest of the unit. The solid back panel is where the load is intended to be carried.
Now were I thinking of using wall units supported by feet, I would be looking to spread the load by putting a batten or a sheet of MDF under the units to spread the load and put the weight onto the side panels.
Does that expalin my reasoning a little better ;-)
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Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
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.

Fair comment, but couldn't he fasten the units to the wall at low level, thus transferring much of the load?
Or, more radically, dispense with legs altogether?
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Your analysis of the structure is quite correct but you wouldn't seriously think of supporting the whole cabinet just on legs would you. If nothing else it would probably just topple over into the room.
The cabinet should be fixed to the wall in exactly the same way as if it were being fixed at normal height. The legs give a little extra support and stop the cabinet from looking like it's floating 8" above the ground - as much of a visual anchor as a structural one.
Phil
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Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Harry,
Our kitchen base units are constructed in exactly the same way as the wall units, ie the sides 'overlap' the top and bottom. All the units are fixed together with the usual metal screws, wood dowelling and glue. They are as solid as the proverbial rock. Put them together myself incidentally. Bought from 'Hygena at Currys'. Very pleased with them.
The wall unit hangers are fixed to the sides of the cabinet, which means that the bottom shelf and its contents are supported by the fixings between that shelf and the side panel. In similar fashion, the bottom shelf of the base unit, to which the legs are fixed, supports the whole unit, even though the sides overlap. Isn't this normal?
Tony
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On 23/01/2004 Tony Hayes opined:-

Hi Tony,
My wall units are similar in that a corner bracket is fixed to both sides and solid back panel, but the base fits inside rather than over lapping the sides. The corner brackets are where the units are fixed to the wall.
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Harry (M1BYT) (Lap)
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Ensure you have part of the legs [use all 4] under the side panels, otherwise you are relying on a couple of screw & dowels to take the weight of the unit, the worktop & the 18 stone househusband/wife sitting on the worktop
I have seen the results 'beware'
If you are being paid to do this you WILL be sued when it all goes pear shaped.
Do not think the plinth will hold it up, it wont, it tips forward, taking the bottom of the unit with it, so the worktop tilts backwards, the 'sitter' ends up folded in half, trapped between the wall & the back of the unit. When I was told of this when I came to put it right for the 'DIY expert' who did it, I fell about when the 'victim/sitter' told me the sorry tale. I never got the job, 'sad to say' but it was worth the laugh.
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regards
Dave Batter
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units?
On another shift to this, does anyone know where I can find those metal brackets that fit the corners of a wall mounted cabinet, that joined the top/bottom to the sides and have another face at 90 degrees so they can be screwed to the wall?
Dave
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On Thu, 22 Jan 2004 23:52:36 +0000 (UTC), "Dave"

B&Q have them.
They also have a type where you can fit a bracket to the wall and there is an adjustable fitting on the cabinet so that you can adjust cabinet location accurately.
.andy
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wrote:

I use those whenever I've got a choice. They allow the cabinet to be "hung" onto the small rail that is fixed to the wall, then a screw (vertical) pulls the cabinet up/down. Once the correct position has been established another screw (horizontal) pulls the cabinet to the wall.
Makes cabinet hanging relatively easy.
PoP
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wrote:

be
I looked in my local warehouse, but did not see them. Perhaps they are on the showroom section, I'll take a look. Thanks Andy.
Dave
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On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 19:34:17 +0000 (UTC), "Dave"

In the stores that I typically go to - Farnborough and sometimes Reading, they are on shelves close to the kitchen showroom section along with the other kitchen fitting bits and bobs for their range like shelf brackets and the like, not with the rest of the general hardware.
Alternatively Screwfix have them - parts 19951 and 14309
.andy
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