Using a mains powered lamp in a lighting circuit

Hi
There is a little nook (or maybe a cranny)in my house that needs lighting up. A little idea I have had is to wire a bog standard shop bought mains powered lamp into the right lighting circuit.
Is there any problem with taking off the plug, and fitting the lamp onto a lighting curcuit? I can't see one with a normal lamp, but possibly with a mains powered halogen desk light for example?
Thanks in advance
James
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James W wrote:

Don't see why not. I have rewired loads of standard lamps and table lamps with 5A plugs to fit my secondary lighting circuits...

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On Thu, 8 Jan 2004 22:04:33 UTC, jameswilson snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (James W) wrote:

Well, you'd need to use an FCU so that the connecting cable to the lamp (flex?) was still correctly protected. For convenience, make that feed a 5A round pin socket so that you can more easily and safely maintain the lamp.
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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(James W)

A new extension in the house I bought has a few sockets that are connected to the lighting circuit. They are round pin (presumably so that you cannot accidentally plug in a 3 bar heater). It works fine and was professionally installed so I assume it is legal.
P.S. I have found it very hard to find a source for round pin plugs
Hope this helps
Frank
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    frank snipped-for-privacy@ireland.com (Frank Davis) writes:

B&Q
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Any electrical wholesaler should stock them - TLC do. Think you may find 5 amp types in the larger B&Qs etc. I prefer 2 amp as they are neater
--
*Suicidal twin kills sister by mistake.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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"Frank Davis" wrote | P.S. I have found it very hard to find a source for round pin plugs
http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/TLPT2.html 2A http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Products/TLPT5.html 5A
Or your local electrical factors. NB round pin plugs are now supposed to have sleeved pins as well.
Owain
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Best way to do this is to fit a 2 amp 3 pin socket to the lighting circuit. I don't think the sheds stock them, but any wholesaler will. They are the same size as a one gang 13 amp socket.

You could do this with a halogen low voltage desk light too ok - but if you have a dimmer on the circuit it might have to be changed for a suitable one as the transformer will be an inductive load.
--
*If you lived in your car, you'd be home by now *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On 08/01/2004 James W opined:-

The usual way to do this would be to wire from the lighting circuit, to a socket close to where you want the light. A 5amp 3pin plug and socket is the one most often used for this purpose.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT)...
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