URGENT Leaking hot water cylinder (pressurised) HELP

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Hi
My hot water cylinder is dripping, and to be honest, it looks pretty dead - huge amounts of corrosion everywhere.
Sadly its not simple...
I've got a pressurised water system, and the cylinder is labelled Polystel PS125 / 3 - with operating pressure of 3 bar. All the pipework goes into the to of the cylinder through a metal cap that looks like a beer bottle top. Its leaking from under there. The rust is quite evident and obvious.
Photos of tank are at:-
http://www.ryanandmel.com/tank1.jpg and
http://www.ryanandmel.com/tank2.jpg
I have no idea if its direct or indirect (don't even know what this means) - and as an avid DIY'er I know I can swap it for a like item. However, I can find nothing at all on the web about this cylinder and all the ones I can find have side entry pipes - which clearly isn't what I'm looking for.
I've called 3 plumbers, and one can't quote for 3 weeks, one can't speak to me till Monday and one isn't interested. Oh what a trade! Any recommendations for plumbers in West Drayton/Uxbridge area appreciated!
ANY HELP AT ALL is appreciated - this forum has been very helpful in the past - so here's hoping!
Thanks!
RJ
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Hi
My hot water cylinder is dripping, and to be honest, it looks pretty dead - huge amounts of corrosion everywhere.
Sadly its not simple...
I've got a pressurised water system, and the cylinder is labelled Polystel PS125 / 3 - with operating pressure of 3 bar. All the pipework goes into the to of the cylinder through a metal cap that looks like a beer bottle top. Its leaking from under there. The rust is quite evident and obvious.
Photos of tank are at:-
http://www.ryanandmel.com/tank1.jpg and
http://www.ryanandmel.com/tank2.jpg
I have no idea if its direct or indirect (don't even know what this means) - and as an avid DIY'er I know I can swap it for a like item. However, I can find nothing at all on the web about this cylinder and all the ones I can find have side entry pipes - which clearly isn't what I'm looking for.
I've called 3 plumbers, and one can't quote for 3 weeks, one can't speak to me till Monday and one isn't interested. Oh what a trade! Any recommendations for plumbers in West Drayton/Uxbridge area appreciated!
ANY HELP AT ALL is appreciated - this forum has been very helpful in the past - so here's hoping!
Thanks!
RJ
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Hi
My hot water cylinder is dripping, and to be honest, it looks pretty dead - huge amounts of corrosion everywhere.
Sadly its not simple...
I've got a pressurised water system, and the cylinder is labelled Polystel PS125 / 3 - with operating pressure of 3 bar. All the pipework goes into the to of the cylinder through a metal cap that looks like a beer bottle top. Its leaking from under there. The rust is quite evident and obvious.
Photos of tank are at:-
http://www.ryanandmel.com/tank1.jpg and
http://www.ryanandmel.com/tank2.jpg
I have no idea if its direct or indirect (don't even know what this means) - and as an avid DIY'er I know I can swap it for a like item. However, I can find nothing at all on the web about this cylinder and all the ones I can find have side entry pipes - which clearly isn't what I'm looking for.
I've called 3 plumbers, and one can't quote for 3 weeks, one can't speak to me till Monday and one isn't interested. Oh what a trade! Any recommendations for plumbers in West Drayton/Uxbridge area appreciated!
ANY HELP AT ALL is appreciated - this forum has been very helpful in the past - so here's hoping!
Thanks!
RJ
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RJ wrote:

Well, if you had to post three times, you are obviously despreate.
I have no good news for you.
Its obviosuly a mains pressure cylinder, and these are expensive to replace and install and SHOULD be tested by qualified plumber.
First off, this is not going to be a quick fix. Talk to insurance company and see if they will fnd whatever you need to live a decent life whilst your house is effectively wihout hot water.
Secondly get a plumber in who can at least isolate the thing and still leave you with central heating. That is not such a hard job.
Then take three deep breaths and get on the net to find out more about the system you have, and what might replace it. Expect at least 4-6 weeks of no hot water though.
My deepest sympathies too.

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How embaressing.
Sorry indeed! I only meant to post once - the google posting engine kept failing - it was not meant to be posted 3 times. Hopefully I don't look too stupid! ;)
I'll read your thoughts. Only initial comment is entire top of the tank is corroded and "flakey" as hell - as if its been leaking for years. In fact its how it was when I moved in. So maybe its beyond that.
I've jimmied up a nice gaffer tape and bic-biro contraption that conveniently routes all the water to be collected in a container!
Ahem. Not a great solution - but does mean hot water and heating!
I don't mind replacing the whole thing - 15 years is a good life - but can't find any equivalent models anywhere - and the local plumbers are too busy.
Thanks again - I'll read and consider!

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Replace it with a heat bank. They operate at low pressures. Forget an unvented cylinder. http://www.heatweb.com http://www.range-cylinders.co.uk (go to thermal stores) http://www.albion-online.co.uk (the mainsflow)
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If the cylinder needs replacing - then I guess that is a reasonable idea. However I've read that these [may] need descaling every couple of years or so - and hence the running costs are very expensive?
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wrote in message news:<btp98a$937>

Heats banks have a plate heat exchanger. These stainless steell flexible plates that resist scale. In a hard water areas a phosphor de-scaler should be fitted anyway, no matter what type of system you have.
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Cheers. See other thread from the poor multiple post....
The heat bank idea is growing on me - esp if I can't find a plumber! Just wish I could chat to someone for 1/2 hour over a beer and a pen & paper so I can fully understand how the heck everything works. i.e. exactly what pipe does what (why aren't they all labelled!?) which would help with a full replacement!
hahahahaha!!!
Time for some Sunday beer contemplation and surfing of plumbing sites.
wrote in message news:<btp98a$937>

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RJ wrote:

Install a water softener - a proper one - and forget de-scaling.
Without getting onvolved in heatbanks, I had the opportunity to completely design HW and CH for the new house.
The numbers of baths and showers really meant that combi/heatbank looked more expensive than a smaller boiler (hate wasting space) driving a mains pressure system. Plus if I ran out of oil, I could immersion heat the HW.
I insatlled a water softener and mains pressure system. Its fabulous. Only downsiode to teh water softener - apart from filling it with 5 quid of salt a month - is that peak flow rates are reduced a little.
If you have to start ripping stuff out, I'd strongly recommend you fit a new pressurised tank, and an ion exchange water softener. No scaling on your equipment, no nasty scum on your bathwater, use less soap on teh washing...its works as advertised.
My softener is quite large, and so is my tank. About 500 quid each from memory. Its at least a days work to plumb the tank, less for the softener. You SHOULD vave all the pipes there you need, but you MAY need to extend and adapt them.
I shold get planning and researching and hope that your bodges hold up long enough to get the job planned properly for the spring.
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Ion exchange water softner? Time to do some more research!
Though the installation of unvented systems needs to be by a qualified plumber etc, why does a replacement when in effect, I guess, it'll be factory tested cylinder and all that needs is it to be disconnected and reconnected. All joins can be tested with cold pressure water, and all the other pipework is "as designed" and as per building regs by the original installer.
SO especially if its like-for-like, it should be a trivial job to replace cylinder and all anciliaries...?
Unless I'm missing something.
Oh more good news - can't find any Polystel references on the web - so no spares here and probably need just a replacement if I go that route.
Lots of ideas and research needed!!

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On 11 Jan 2004 12:38:09 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (RJ) wrote:

According to Building Regulations, you are supposed to use a plumber certified in the installation of pressurised cylinders.
In practice, building control officers don't go round with detector vans.
Problems would arise if:
- Something goes wrong and the cylinder bursts or explodes or causes damage, especially if anyone were injured.
- You want to sell the property and the buyer's solicitor is vigilant and asks for a certificate with respect to the installation.

.andy
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wrote in message news:<btp98a$937>

I don't think you loked hard enough.

Heat banks can have immersions too.

Forget this idea.
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BigWallop wrote:

Do you really think it can be resealed to 5 bar tested? Safely?
Not disagreeing, just curious.
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Depends on how competent the OP is, although the banding does a lot of the work in pulling the two bits back together again, and as long as the correct seals are used, then it is a job that can be done by someone who's good with their hands and head (as in a bit of brain power). :-))
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Semi tempted by this thought - but for 2 things - 1 getting the right seal - I can't find any mention of this particular setup on the web anywhere! and 2 - the top of the cylinder looks so rusted, that if all the rust is removed and cleaned away, it'll be impossible to reseal as the cylinder is so pitted and rusted...
My neighbours had theirs replaced (by their landlord) - So I'll call them and see if they can take a look - whilst on DIY issues I'd say I'm 8/10 er, I'm not at all ofay with this type of setup....

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IMM wrote:

This is another rare occasion where I tend to agree with you :-)
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Amazing! You gradually learning then.

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On 11 Jan 2004 01:54:00 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@mail.com (RJ) wrote:

Then don't do it. This is a cylinder of hot water at 60 degrees, stored under mains pressure - up to about about 4 bar. Really, according to Building Regulations they are supposed to be (legally speaking) installed and maintained by a plumber specifically trained on pressurised cylinders.
Normally, I will tackle anything with respect to plumbing, and I am far from being a fan of government regulation but looking at your photos, I wouldn't entertain the idea of trying to fix this cylinder. Even if you can clean it up, and it looks doubtful to me, then you would have to be very sure that it all goes back together properly. What you don't know is whether the cylinder has in other respects corroded and deteriorated. I would say that this really isn't worth the risk.
If you want to DIY this, then IMM's idea of a heatbank does make sense. It would be quite easy to plumb this in, although a bit of wiring would be needed, and it has the advantage that the contents of the cylinder are not under pressure. The heat is stored in the cylinder in the form of water at low pressure and then this is pumped through an efficient heat exchanger to heat the mains water. With a vented primary system you can connect directly. I notice on yours what looks to be a small pressure vessel for the heating (red) at the corner of the picture. In this case you have a sealed system and you would use an indirect heat bank with its own header tank built in.
Alternatively, you could just get the cylinder replaced with a new pressurised one. However this really is a job that is supposed to be done by a trained professional. If you were a 10/10 person on plumbing then I'd suggest that you make your own value judgment on whether to DIY, but since you say 8/10, then I would think carefully. If you get it wrong then you can create a dangerous situation.

.andy
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