UPVC Window Problem

My UPVC windows regularly suffer from condensation around the lower half of the windows - about 1- 1.5 " around the edge of the glass
I have been told this may be because the double glazed units are sealed with a metal bead - this is causing a cold spot which reacts with our CH (radiator under each window)
The problem is worse at night when we are sleeping
My neighbours windows don't seem to suffer the same way
Could this be a fault or is it common ??? Any suggestions to remedy
-- Regards
Hays
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On Mon, 24 Nov 2003 12:08:11 -0000, "hays"

I'd say it's normal this time of year (assuming it's on the room side of the glass).

The moisture comes from respiration and condenses out on the coldest part of the room.

It's worse if you have thick curtains which insulate the window from the heat of the room but still allow damp air through. The neighbours may also have better ventilation.

I dare say double glazed units vary in design and quality but the only fault I'm aware of is when condensation appears within the sealed unit, then it's a replacement job.

In order of practicality
1) Increase ventilation, (we open a window on the "first notch")
2) Try to get the moist air out of the room, Might need a fan running all night.
3) Replace with cold dry air from outside and heat it up to room temp to get the RH down. Might need some heating on all night.
On the bright side I'm sure this would be healthier and if not would definitely be good for the soul.
DG
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derek wrote:

Normal state of affairs for my DG. Doesn't exist if there's a window (in my case *THE* window, since mine are medium square ones that open wholly, hinged at the top). Like the poster said, it's just condensing out on slightly cooler glass - if it's on the inside, rather than between the windows - from the warm damp air from breathing humans/washing drying indoors.
Try and cut down the inherent dampness of the air (open a window while cooking, don't dry washing indoors, open a window slightly after a bath) - and crack a window open in the bedroom overnight.
Other than that, just give it a quick wipe with a sponge in the morning if it bothers you. One of the down sides with DG is that there's less ventilation in the house going on if all the windows are shut. Normal windows often have slight drafts - one of the attractions of fitting DG, but those drafts do at least change the air in the room overnight.
Velvet
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Had same problem didn`t want to open window defeats purpose of DG in winter. Bought a dehumidifier and leave that on during night with all doors open and problem solved.
Andrew
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with
Bit of a tangent, but possibly an answer:
Do those damp absorbing trays (available from Wilkinsons etc) work? They have some form of chemical you put into a basket which absorbs the damp I think.
Phil
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manoman wrote:

[SNIP]
Yes, for a very short time e.g. 1 night. If you work out how much of the dry chemical you'd really need to absorb significant amounts of moisture its impractical. One of the hardware store chains stopped selling them because they had so many returns.
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Yes, its a cold bridge and may be due to the design of the frame, and not just the glass unit. It is quite common.
It is very difficult to stop, as whatever you do heating a ventilation wise, the area of frame and edge of glass still remains at a cooler temperature.
A better, more thermally efficient frame may be the only answer
dg

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