U values for older houses ?

U values for older houses ?
In a previous thread a discussion formed over the merits of new houses over old, one obvious advantage being the greater thermal efficiency of new houses.
The current building regs for the U value of external walls is 0.35. My 1950's "ventilated brick cavity brick" is apprently 1.9.
Does anybody know what the likely U values would be for older houses e.g. victorian houses with solid brick/stone walls, cottages with 2 foot thick stone walls etc.
TIA
Paul
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"Paul(Retired)" wrote:

According to Myson heat loss calculator, a 200mm solid brick wall is 1.8, 18inch solid stone is 2.5.
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wrote:

Thanks both for the info.
Looks like there ain't no such thing as a cosy cottage then !.
Paul
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Once you get it up to temp :-)
I'm happy with cosiness inside my 18" walls but I always have the heating on just a bit so that I never have to heat it up from cold.
--
fred

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Paul(Retired) wrote:

Check out cob then. 2 ft thick mud, straw and cow dung. Excellent U values :)

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