Tool for digging grooves in walls

Page 1 of 2  
Need some kit for making a better appearance to my cabling work, I'm after kit for digging grooves into walls so I can bury a couple of power cables in the walls before being plastered over again. Having trawled various DIT sites I've come across horrifically expensive 'wall chasers'. Are these the best bits of kit for the job, and anyone know good soures of them? Or for a shallowish groove in wall is an angle grinder okay? Also wondering if anyone know of tools for digging holes to fit flush-mounted sockets out easily, or is it just a case of whacking away at it with a lump hammer and chisel?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Irwin wrote:

Angle grinder will do the job neatly and quickly BUT will make clouds of fine dust over everything and the rest of the house. Chain drilling with a masonry drill and follow up with a bolster will take longer thna the angle grinder but a lot quicker and easier than hammer and bolster alone.
Bob
--
To Reply directly to my mailbox, change myisp to ntlworld


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In an earlier contribution to this discussion, Robert Irwin <catfishpcAThotmailDOTcom> wrote:

Screwfix sell a variety of attachments for making channels for cables and cutting box holes - all of which require an SDS drill with rotation stop. The box hole cutter is expensive and apparently makes a *lot* of dust. Many say that an SDS chisel is almost as good, with less dust.
Angle grinders also make a lot of dust. A channel cutter is probably better and neater - and not fantastically expensive.
I've already got an SDS drill and chisel. I think that I were doing a lot of wiring, I would invest in a channel cutter but not bother with the box hole cutter.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Robert Irwin" <catfishpcAThotmailDOTcom> wrote in message

lump
SDS channeling chisel:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/sea/searchresults.jsp ;jsessionidAXP3Q0EZZRMBCJO2C4CIIQ?_dyncharset=UTF-8&q=&n6724&pn=1&pd=1&pi=1&cn=1&cd=1&x=0&y=0
SDS socket sinker:
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/sea/searchresults.jsp ;jsessionidAXP3Q0EZZRMBCJO2C4CIIQ?_dyncharset=UTF-8&q=&n4206&pn=1&pd=1&pi=1&cn=1&cd=1&x=7&y
Happy Christmas !
Andrew Mawson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

after
cables
chasers'.
of
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/sea/searchresults.jsp ;jsessionidAXP3Q0EZZRMBCJO2C4CIIQ?_dyncharset=UTF-8&q=&n6724&pn=1&pd=1&pi=1&cn=1&cd=1&x=0&y=0
http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/sea/searchresults.jsp ;jsessionidAXP3Q0EZZRMBCJO2C4CIIQ?_dyncharset=UTF-8&q=&n4206&pn=1&pd=1&pi=1&cn=1&cd=1&x=7&y
Thanks chaps
Its a new house where everything is being gutted anyway, so dust isn't a big worry. Will probably go for the SDS drill as it looks safest (!) and I can probably use it for other jobs too.
As a matter of interest, is it worth putting some sort of trunking in the groove before putting cable in, or can I get away with just slapping plaster over it?
Sorry - I'm a newbie to all this (1st 'proper' house...)
Cheers and merry Chrimbo
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Irwin scribbled :

Use capping which is specifically used to cover cables. Its just nailed over the top of the cables and comes either as metal or plastic, plastic is much easier for cutting and fixing.
--
Gary
Please remove #NOSPAM# if replying via email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In an earlier contribution to this discussion,

Metal capping is much safer - because it makes it much harder to drill into the cable by accident! Metal can be cut fairly easily with tip snips - and held in place with galvanised felt nails prior to plastering over it. [Even if the walls are brick, you can usually nail into the mortar courses without too much difficulty].
Metal capping comes in various widths for different cable sizes. One of the most popular sizes takes two 2.5mm^2 T&W cables side by side for ring main wiring. You might find that you have to go to a proper electrical wholesaler to get metal capping - many of the DIY sheds only seem to stock the plastic rubbish these days.
--
Cheers,
Set Square
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And so long as you stay within the allowed "zones" or bury the cable more than 50mm (you're not going to do that in a normal wall with a channelling chisel) you don't need protection for the cable(s) at all. Off the top of my head, the allowed zones are within 150mm of a corner (wall/wall or wall/ceiling, NOT wall/floor) and vertically or horizontally directly out of one of those zones to an accessory (switch or socket).
Not entirely safe - assumes people won't put shelf brackets or picture hooks up within 150mm of a corner for example - but withing regs nevertheless.
On the subject of SDS channelling chisels, my 24 one from Screwfix just broke (snapped off in the chuck). It's only had a couple of hours' use, mainly in plaster but occasionally hitting a stone or a brick. Grrr... time to get on the phone I think.
Hwyl!
M.
--
Martin Angove: http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk /
Two free issues: http://www.livtech.co.uk/ Living With Technology
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mine did that too.
-- John Stumbles -+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-|-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ -+ The most dangerous component in a car is the nut that holds the steering wheel
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: snip

Just as I was about to buy one from Screwfix as well, thanks for the info. Now that I've had a wee look around I see that I can get what appears to be the same thing from Buck and Hickman/Farnell. Unfortunately no pic of the "chasing gouge" at 24.91, but the 75mm spade chisel that I'm really after comes in at a 20 (plus VAT), compared to 30 from Screwfix.
cheers
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Moodie wrote:

Wheelhouse in Hounslow provided me with a set of four SDS chisels (cutting, wedge, chasing and point) at 7.95 with 20% off marked price in the sale. They've survived better than the Homebase SDS drill :(
--
Tony Bryer SDA UK 'Software to build on' http://www.sda.co.uk
Free SEDBUK boiler database browser http://www.sda.co.uk/qsedbuk.htm
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Surely there is one present on this group.
IMM!
He is a tool and he may have sufficient aptitude to dig a groove in a wall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robert Irwin wrote

As it's a new house maybe the walls are built of Thermalite or Celcon blocks. If so they're so soft you can almost do it with your finger nails. I'd have a go with a hammer & chisel first before buying expensive gear.
Peter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

blocks.
have a

Ah no - the house is new to me, not a new house. Its a 50s ex-council job and the walls are VERY solid - mainly solid brick (don't know exact type TBH) or stone in places.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thats answered my question, I was wondering why you were rewiring a new house !!
Dave
--
And you were born knowing all about ms windows....??


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's unlikely to have engineering brick so you should still be able to manage with a 3" boulster and a 16 oz hammer. I would steer clear of a 4" boulster and lump hammer if I was a newbie -and knew enough to realise that a little and often is the best MO chasing anything.
You need to go deep enough to bury the wire and -when patching the plaster, cover the tin protector. An house that old may have enough cement rendering under the plaster to save you chasing into the brickwork.
Whatever, it would be a cold day in hell before I shelled out 20 to 40 quid or more on sds tools just for the one job.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it's going to be done by hand a chasing comb and with lump hammer would be more suitable.
--
Alan
mailto:news2me_a snipped-for-privacy@amacleod.clara.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

A 4" boulster and a lump hammer is all you need. About 5 or 10 quid in the local market. However if you have never used a lump hammer you might find a lighter one a lot easier to use.
If it took half an hour to hack out for each point and you wanted say three each in (how many rooms do council houses have?) that would take you less than a day. But you would be wielding an unusual weight for most of that day.
That was all I was trying to point out.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

The plastic jigs that are the outline of a wall box and let you drill multiple chain holes are well worth the pound or two that they cost. I've cut perhap 100 wall box holes in various houses over the years using a bolster chisel and lump hammer, but recently got one of the jigs and find them excellent.
Andrew Mawson
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.