Tips on cutting a worktop

Bought a 4 meter kitchen worktop which has to be cut in exactly the right place to make 2 work tops for two kitchen units, cost 90 quid so really don't want to cock it up
Which saw has best chance of cutting a straight line and not chipping the top :-
General hardwood type saw with the flexible blade (worked well when cutting the wooden floor I put down) such as this one (
http://www.diy.com/images/products/image_l/5014957135147_H_1_l.jpg )
Tenon Saw (won't bend) (
http://www.diy.com/images/products/image_l/7311518002688_su1_1_l.jpg )
Electric Jigsaw (don't fancy making a straight cut with this)
Circular Saw (reckon it will rip the top to bits)
Should I put any masking or insulation tape where I am going to cut
Any advice welcome
Chris
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Chris Vowles wrote:

Of those listed, this would be my choice. It won't rip the top to bits - you get a surprisingly clean cut with a circular saw on laminate.

On the bullnose, yes. The rest of the cut won't need it.
--
Grunff


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--
John

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John Armstrong wrote:

Yeah, sorry - I should've said that. If you cut from above it will tear the laminate off!
--
Grunff


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Use the Circular saw, cut the worktop upside down so that the teeth are hitting the face rather than lifting it, cut front to back and use a straight edge guide and line it up with a decent square. Do all that and you will have a nice clean, square and straight cut.
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Agreed.
If you clamp the straight edge to the side you are keeping (ie. not the waste side) then you can't go wrong. Even if you do wander from the guide it will cut into the waste portion and not ruin your finished cut.
Sean
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If things are that tight you are going to struggle. Will the thickness of the circular saw blade rob you of too much material? If so you're going to have to use a jigsaw for a thinner blade.
If you can afford to loose the SC blade thickness then you could always attach a second straight edge to stop you from wandering off the line.
Sean
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On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 12:07:34 +0000 (UTC), "Sean Delere"

Thanks for the advice, I have about 5-10mm spare!
Chris
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Simon wrote in message ...

plastic storage bins. Cheaper than saw horses and don't take up much room. Also the lower height is better for circ saw operation. You can put your foot on the workpiece and have both hands free for the saw. Make sure the batten you're following overhangs the worktop at the beginning of the cut by 6" or so. This means that the blade is in the right position and spinning niceley before it touches the workpiece.
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Does one end butt into tiles. If so that will give you some leaway, praps 8 mm if you need it depending on tile thickness.
-- ________________________________________________________________
Peter Scott ________________________________________________________________

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Cut 3mm oversize with the circular saw and then shave off the remaining with a half inch router with clamped guides.
Christian.
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