Thermostatic shower problem

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wrote:

They
illicit
This sort of stuff caused the Mafia to rise to power. Elliot Ness will have to raid everyone's bathroom.
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15lpm is not a drencher. That is 25lpm plus.
You are no more qualified than a self build magazine to say what people want.

.andy
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wrote:

doesn't
Well it's not the same as you, that is clear.
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Andy Hall wrote in message ...

Interesting to note that a Drencher shower with body jets can require 10 gallons per minute! I know of a set up with 2 x 50 gallon water heaters( in parallel) which runs out of thermostatically controlled water in around 10 minutes. The shower temperature then drops significantly because the thermostatic valve cannot reduce the cold supply sufficiently to work correctly! It is of course, worse in winter.
Regards Capitol
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eaters( in

Having a large boiler dumping all its heat, using a priority system, and a blending valve on the flow and return of the boiler can deliver replenish approx 10 litres a minute plus water into the cylinder. With this sort of draw-off, a flow switch should be used on the shower hot pipe, to bring in the boiler immediately. In short, use all available from boiler and cylinders.
Drencher shower were outlawed in parts of the USA.
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I've got a related question. We're installing a new shower and combi boiler system: I've been told by the guy who's installing the boiler that we should definitely go for a manual separate hot/cold shower as these are far more reliable, particularly in hard water areas (london). Is he right? I don't like the idea of fiddling with the controls all the time and having the water go hot and cold.
Any advice much appreciated.
n
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On 11 Jan 2004 06:06:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@savemail.com (Nathan) wrote:

If you buy a good quality one (Mira, Aqualisa, Grohe, Hansgrohe) then it will be fine, although with any shower, thermostatic or not, you will have to descale the head in a hard water area.
.andy
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Nathan wrote:

Its rubbish. I fitted the victorian style, as sold by Screwfix & others, to a small combi in a London flat and it great..
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It will have to have an integrated pressure equalisation valve inside, otherwise he is an idiot for saying that. Mira, and others make mixer with them integrated. They can be fitted in the pipes before the mixer as a separate unit.
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Cubik wrote:

I had similar problem when I fitted Victorian style, Screwfix supplied, to a small combi boiler. The manufacurer was very helpful. Firstly they said to make sure the flow restrictors to Hot and Cold feeds were appropriate to the installation. (Several of these were supplied in the kit) e.g. cold main feed and combi hot feed. Then they told me of another adjustment which meant taking the valve off the wall and adjusting a large screw in the back. This altered the amount of HW flow in the valve and did the trick. The end user is very happy with the result. You'll need to find the install instructions for your unit and/or speak to the manufacturer.
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Simple my dear Watson What is happening here probably is the following As you will be aware combi heated water gets cooler the more the flow, but the thermostatic shower does not realise this so it says i want hotter water so i will increase the ratio of hot water to cold . This of course then increases the flow of hot which makes the water cooler. The tap in the sink is adjusted by you so if the water is too cool what do you do. Yes decrease the flow. Solution turn down the input flow of water to the combi so it never flows too cold. Well worked a treat for me
HTH Phil
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