Surveyor's

Page 2 of 2  
writes

French drains are pretty outdated technology these days. There are good geotextiles that will stop silt getting into a drainage trench, there are some good drawings of this on Cormaics site.
John
--
John Rouse

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

guttering
ours
Agreed. Am using one. But it's still a French drain, isn't it ?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

No, its still relevant. They haven't found a single case yet. Indeed one group built brick pillars in a swimming pool in an attempt to investigate rising damp, and could find no trace of it. If your water table is so high that your footings are standing in water, then dampness is the least of your problems - getting to your car is going to need wellies at the least.

Most moisture in such situations comes from condensation on the cooler stone.

Indeed.
--
John Rouse

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well I can show you water coming out of a floor up a brick internal wall quite happily.

True. If you live in a field you expect it.

random
Sorry but that's not true. Condensation would rise from the inside and work outwards (and up) whereas damp tends to start on the outside and work in (and up).

Only solution now permitted by clued up conservation officers in listed buildings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Will they give me one for what is undoubtedly rising damp in my stone cottage in Gloucestershire?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

London
cottage
IIRC the BRE findings refer to brickwork. Stone is a different kettle of fish.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No, as it undoubtedly isn't, unless your house is built in a river. Even in my house, where there is a spring under the floor, the only dampness is where the outside soil is against the cellar walls.
John
--
John Rouse

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@pst.co.uk wrote in message

Bear in mind that most damp is not *rising* but penetrating. A DPC will therefore make no difference and you will be wasting the bank's money having it done. IME surveyors know sod all about damp in older properties.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

As commented elsewhere, the "surveyor" is likely not to be a Chartered Surveyor at all, but some form of valuer from an approved panel, and hence your observation is probably quite accurate.
Properly qualified Building Surveyors generally do know a thing or two about damp (and structures).
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
" snipped-for-privacy@pst.co.uk" wrote:

You'll have to do a little investigation and DIY!
Where the damp course is bridged (rendered over, paths built up, plants, flower beds etc.), remove the bridging. Reduce the level of the outside to below DPC (two brick courses ideal, one is likely to suffice, though).
Note that it is possible that the DPC is bridged inside the house - you may have to lift a few boards if so and remove debris.
It has been known that people remove suspended floors and replace without putting down a damp proof membrane. If so, hopefully they've shovelled in a load of gravel, and not concrete!
J.B.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

<snip>
this is entirely possible. When replacing the downstairs flooring recently I removed about 20 rubble-sacks worth of debris and building waste. Some of this certainly bridged the slate DPC. It also blocked the air bricks - looks as if it was simply pushed in by whichever conciencious workman installed the air bricks in the first place...
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It is a solid concrete floor that has water pipes embedded into it. Another worrying thing is that the walls are covered in a variety of cements, pink, grey and white??? The floor is very cold to the touch, as I explained the dampness seems to be confined to a very small part of the kitchen. Is there any way of identifying wether the pipes are leaking without ripping the floor up?
Another possibility I am seriously considering is taking all the plasterwork off, right back down to the brickwork and then hopefully i should be able to see evidence of any sort of dpc (non is visible from outside).
Thanks Jaz
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I guess you have a terraced house and your kitchen is a single story extensions. Often these were bodged on, and are single skin brickwork with no damp proof couce. Not the sort of post-purchase discovery you really want.
Don't worry, even if you had paid the extra for a full survey, and they guy did not find it, you would be in the same situation, but 1000 pounds less in your wallet for the survayors fees.
Rick
On 6 Jan 2004 09:41:41 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@pst.co.uk ( snipped-for-privacy@pst.co.uk) wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.