Strong enought bed frame

Hi group,
I have built a high bedframe out of CLS and planed timber. Its size is approx 2metres but 1.2metres. The two longest joists are 2x4 planed timber and spans the 2 metre gap. The 4x2 is 4ft apart, to span this gap I used 3x2 CLS These are at 400mm centres. There is a piece of 1x1 attached to the inside of the 4x2 using some 2 inch screws from the inside. A 1x1 area is notched out of the bottom of the 3x2 at each side which rests on the 1x1, then two No 10/4inch screws are screwed through the outside of the frame into the 3x2, one screw goes through the 4x2, 1x1 and into the 3x2 the second screw goes thoough the 4x2 straight into the 3x2 slightly above the 1x1, this is on both sides. The top 3x2 is approx 15mm lower than the top of the 4x2 to accommodate a peice of 12mm MDF which will be screwed to the 3x2 to create a flat surface for the matress. My question is, will this support the weight of two people, its not going to give way in the middle of the night is it? The 3x2 is rated ok for this sort of gap? the no 10 4 inch screws are suitable to hold the joists to the frame? To be on the safe side would adding in more 3x2 solve the issue (its very cheap!) instead of every 400mm, say every 200mm? would this distribute the weight better?
Thanks, James
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (James Simpson) wrote:

The standard means of connection of long bed sides to end frames is to use bolts, for maximum rigidity the long member should be tenoned into the end frame to about 1/3rd depth and bolted. The dimensions should be fine, our kingsize is made from pine of those dimensions. The long members are bolted but not tenoned and the bed does rack somewhat, especially during, ah more physical activities.
You may have problems with the solid base too. Generally you would use slats running cross wise and sitting on your 1x1. Our kingsize has a strip down the middle and a central support as well to prevent sag in the middle. If you go down either route it is advisable not to but the wood/plywood right up to the 4x2, leave a gap and you will get less creaking, especially during those physical activities.
If I was to build a bed I would both tenon and bolt the long members. I'm considering taking ours apart and cutting mortises and gluing a false tenon into the long member before redrilling it for the bolts. its either that or build a new one ;-)
Peter
--
Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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If you have a pocket sprung mattress, it should lie on a solid base. That can mean having to lay sheet material over slats if that is what the bed comes with.
Colin Bignell
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (James Simpson) wrote in message

If I understood you, youve got plenty of wood ther, no worries on that count.
Its recommended to ventilate your base sheet, but its often not done.
Regards, NT
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