Steel baths

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Frankly, the sink, toilet, and most of the rest of the bathroom are unlikely to survive anyway if someone starts swing a sledge hammer around, so there seems little point in having a sledgehammer-proof bath ;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

I had a hell of a job smashing up a cast iron bath. Took ALL my strength with a short sledge - dunno what youd call it - between a club hammer and a sledge.
Only way to get it out.
Shame, as it was worthh a coule of hundred probably...
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BillR wrote:

I paid around 250 I think.
Readily avialable - except in teh sheds of course.

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Er, yes, but you normally have rubber ducks in the bath to play with not sledge hammers. How often do cast iron baths break in use?

They've worked very well for a hundred years or more.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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Pressed steel is much stronger than those cheap plastic baths. When I did our bathroom I installed a Kaldewi that has 3.5mm enamelled steel. It neither bends or flexes. The kids can jump up and down in it with out any harm coming to it. And its very heavy. 2 of us struggled to get it in position, but well worth the money. Suspect anything for 55. Kaldewi do a wide range of baths, this must be one of the cheaper ones.
Robert
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

standing in - as you fix up other stuff. The steel is quite thin there is little to choose on the 'it feels warmer' criterion.
The plastic one s come is a much large variety of shapes colours and sizes, whereas the stell ones tend to be plain 'contract' versions in the standard 1.7m length.
--
Ed Sirett - Property maintainer and registered gas fitter.
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Andrew Gabriel wrote:

Hi Andrew
We did this discussion about two years ago, IIRC. Comments on heat loss, flexing, etc.
I really like our Kaldewei one. Its 750 wide, and has a nice square, slip resistant area for an over the bath shower. Best design I've ever seen/used for this sort of thing. I think they can get steeper sides on a steel bath.
Also has a nice slope at the other end for lazing in the bath.
Obviously you can get acrylic baths in 'over size' as well, so the size thing isn't necessarily a gating factor. I think the Armacast ones are nice and solid , but don't come cheap.
You may have other needs that will change the preferred features though.
HTH IanC
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BillR wrote:

Erm, that's not so, CI is strong.

Eh?
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It is pretty standard to smash up old cast iron with a hammer (if it isn't worth saving, of course).
Christian.
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Putty! Hah. I decided to smash my cast-iron bath up in situ, so I hit it as hard as I could with a 2lb lump hammer on the edge. There was a sound like Big Ben chiming that rendered me deaf and a small flake of enamel came off. Hmmmm. Maybe what I thought was "as hard as I could" wasn't OR I was stuck with a (now chipped) old bath. After wellying the edge over and over, a small crack started, which I had to follow, slowly, with more furious whacking with the hammer. After about an hour I had reduced: the bath to four quarters (each about as heavy as I could manage and each furnished with razor sharp edges that I had to get downstairs without damagaing anything) ; myself to a quivering wreck
If anyone has putty like that, I'd like to see it.
--
Bob Mannix
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Bob Mannix wrote:

That was more or less my experience too, except it had to be smaller than quarters.
I gave it a good whack in the middle, and it chipped the enamel.
I hagev it a mother of a whack, and it flaked off a lump of enamel.
I pondered. I'd nebeen TOLD you could break one...OK I thought. Duel to the death, and gave it everythung I had, and a little bit more for luck.
It just cracked a bit. It took best part of 3 hours to reduce it to bits small enough to go in bags and down to counciil dump.
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I did our old one a few weeks ago [1] - and it was a bit like putty! I was surprised how much the actual CI bent as I was hitting it. I had expected it to be far more brittle. I reckon no more than half an hour of actual bashing to get it into loads of pieces.
Rod
[1] It must have been from the early 1970s.
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One thing I found - the cheap plastic ones had a squarer profile (at the bottom) than the cheap pressed steel ones, which had less 'foot room'. As I was looking for a shower-friendly bath the plastic one won (it was also bundled with a toilet and handbasin at a very cheap price).
HTH Dave R
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I think I'll go into B&Q and try laying in the bath that interested me, like you would do for a bed.
After all, someone seemed to have gone round testing out most of the WC's on display... ;-)
--
Andrew Gabriel

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writes:

Be warned - some of them are displayed vertically :-)
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slightest bit of damage. If I might relate a tale........
Pressurised into doing a job by an established customer that we had no time to do; never mind, couple of evenings and weekends. Replace their old bathroom suite with new WC, sink, bath etc. First Saturday; remove WC sink etc. and replace with new. Customer supplied suite and it had been sat in their garage waiting for us to fit. Carry bath very carefully upstairs, fit bits and install, including ornate 'telephone' style tap/shower unit. Go home. Sunday night phone call explaining that there is a chip in the bath. Argh! Monday morning when I should have been at the current job I inspect the bath. All night I've been worrying that I must have dropped a spanner in the bath (even though we'd been extremely careful with carpet piece in the bath etc.) The chip is at the opposite end of the bath and its fairly obvious the 'dent' is from the outside. Customers look on accusingly and I wonder if I should just take the blame anyway...no I know It's not me so I stand my ground. Customers agree to call suppliers rep in. 2 months later we get a new bath. It's the wrong colour. Another 2 months and we get the right colour but the its chipped even worse; in the same place! Another month and we get another chipped bath. Then another. Finally we get a bath that is OK.
You see; enamelled baths are not very good with the even a light tap; & it's difficult to see any damage until you put hot water in and the expansion blows the scale of enamel off. This leaves a very sharp edge................
--
mark

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