Squeezing in a new bathroom

Imagine a rectangle approximately 6m by 3m. The final 1.5m of the 6m "juts out" from the main body of the house. ASCII diagram (use a monospaced font):
REST OF HOUSE UP HERE 0m 4.5m | 3m | 6m +DD----DD----+--+ 0m | | | | | | +---------------+ 3m
(DD = approx pos'n of existing doors)
Up until recently this was split into two bedrooms of very very approximately 2.5+m by 3m and 3.5-m by 3m (the wall between was a very odd shape and also contained a triangular chimney breast). The partition wall and chimney breast are in the process of being removed.
This rectangle is going to contain two (smaller) bedrooms with a bathroom between because the existing bathroom (elsewhere) contains no loo and isn't big enough to add one. With two small children, having only one loo - and that downstairs - isn't a good idea. What are people's opinions on the best way to split the rooms? Ideally one of the bedrooms (probably the one to the right of the diagram) will still be capable of housing a double bed, but the other need only take a child's bed for now, and at most a single.
As I see it we have two viable options for the bathroom - we can make it 1800mm internally which would give enough space for a bath against the external wall but will squeeze the bedrooms, or we can make it narrower, allowing larger bedrooms but forcing the bath against one of the partition walls.
What would you do?
Hwyl!
M.
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Martin Angove: http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk /
Two free issues: http://www.livtech.co.uk/ Living With Technology
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Fit a Gainsborough corner 1100mm bath( these units are perfect for bathing small children) with over head shower and a curtain into the room and add a 350mm wide loo from B&Q. A small 400mm round china sink from MFI can go into a corner somewhere, or you can place it into an alcove. Remember that walls do not have to be at right angles or the rooms square, I had to fit a bath, 2 doors, chimney stack, shower, loo, bidet and basin into a space 2000x 2400max. Doors can be 24". Angling the doors at about 45degrees optimised the bedroom space and ease of entry. Shuffling a few pieces of paper the right size around on a piece of squared paper can be very helpful, or these days, I use the draw package in Word to see how things will fit. Using the % control. the screen drawing can be sized to a suitable scale, which you can measure on screen with a plastic ruler. ( Before you buy the bits and have to redesign as you go along!) Regards Capitol
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Hmmm... I presume you mean in order to fit everything into the existing bathroom? It might just work - the existing is just about 1.8m by 1.3m - probably 6ft by 4ft internally though we might have to lose the radiator. The biggest problem with that is that the existing is at the front of the house and the drains are at the back - getting 4" around the house is going to be a problem and I am *not* using a little white whirring box.
Oh yes, and I'd earmarked the area as a future "study" :-)
A corner bath is an option in the new bathroom, but budget is the prime concern at the moment and we really liked the size of a "contract" Twyford bath we had in our last house - IIRC the suite came to just £170.
[...]

I use !Draw, a vector graphics package built into every RiscOS computer since 1988 or so. Comes with (among other things) a definable snap-to grid - draw something which says it's 2cm on the screen, an it prints out at 2cm :-) Miniscule files too.
Hwyl!
M.
--
Martin Angove: http://www.tridwr.demon.co.uk /
Two free issues: http://www.livtech.co.uk/ Living With Technology
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1 2 3
1 double bed room with built in robes to cushion sound or bedroom2 2 single bed room with: 3 ensuite with space saving bath running north-south
http://www.bathstore.com/product_master.asp?code 350
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Martin Angove wrote:

The former. But with basin and bog AND door its hard to get a bathroom in less than 2x2m foot print.
My local one to here is 2m x 1.8m with the bath along the 1.8 meter bit, and bog and 'cloakroom' basin just squeezed in alongh the 2m scetion. Door opens opposite that lot.
Hmm. You have 3m across don't you...well if the door opens inwards that is about 80mm ofdead space, leaving you 2.1meters...and a 1700 bath into that...well you MIGHT get the bath and a basin next to it along one 3meter wall, and tuck the loo at the far end on the outer wall and hope you can still open the door enough to get in. If you can go up to say 1.5 meters wide, then you can definitely get the door to open and have either bog or basin alongside bath in the 3meters span.
I'd get out some cardboard and cut bits out and shuffle tll it works.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

A pocket door might be a good idea. Or a pair of half-width doors.
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My bathroom is 1650mm x 1562mm. and I have mnaged to get in a bath (1500mm), basin, WC, cupboard, radiator as well as the window and a door which opens inwards, so all things are possible!
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Bob Mannix wrote:

I'm planning to eventually replace my inward opening bathroom door with a pocket door or double doors - outward would be awkward, due to the other doors in the hallway. It's quite a small bathroom, and the door faces the WC. It isn't all that uncommon for elderly people with heart problems, to pass out while straining. An inward door would be very difficult to open - should the person collapse the body would effectively block the door. It's not a far-fetched scenario - it happened to my next-door neighbour, and to my husband's granny, and I've heard of a number of other cases.
Sheila
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(1500mm),
opens
open -

It's
Yes, I guess it could possibly be the case in my bathroom that someone falling of the bog uncoscious would block the door - I hadn't considered that eventuality. Outward opening double doors with a rebated overlap where the join is might be best for privacy and looks. Most are glazed though and only go down to an aperture of about 3' 10". If there's room to the side of the door in the hall way, a normal door can be converted to fold-back using a product such as:
<http://www.jeld-wen.co.uk/Product.asp?CategoryID 79>
or it's the standard bi-folds:
http://www.jeld-wen.co.uk/Product.asp?CategoryID ˆ
Good luck
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Bob Mannix wrote:

Useful links - thank you.
Sheila
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Curious- Which make of bath ?
--
Andrew

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I'd have a room arranged so that you open the door and immediately encouter the bath to the side, leaving a corridor to the end of the room where the toilet is. The basin can be put at the toilet end at a convenient point, either on the partition or the external wall. This makes the room as thin as 1.4m with a 700mm bath and 700mm door. Having the toilet at the end means that the soil pipe can be on an external wall. It leaves 4.6m for the other rooms. (i.e 1.6/3m or 2/2.6m).
Christian.
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