slow leak in water pipe.

I re-arranged a load of pipework over the weekend in preparation for putting a new sink in the utility. One of the new connections is a soldered 'T' junction on 15mm pipe and I have a very slow leak from one of the connections. When I say slow, it takes around 1 minute for each drop to form and drip into the old ice-cream container I have placed below it.
Now for the obvious question, is there any way of stopping this leak short of disconnecting the 'T' piece and inserting a new one. This is not very desirable as I think I would have to disconnect at least one other fitting in order to get sufficient movement in the pipes.
Incidentally the leak seems to be from the bottom of the pipe, I reckon I could probably have dropped some solder onto the joint had the hole been at the top but my soldering isn't up to doing this at the bottom unless someone knows some useful tricks ?
Thanks.
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Solder flows towards the heat source,so just heat above the joint and apply solder to the joint Mouse

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If smoothering the outside in flux and reheating with a dab of solder doesn't seal it, then discover solder slip couplings and proper pipe cutters. They are your friends for this operation, as you won't need to disconnect any other fittings. You just cut the pipework, make up the new and slide everything into place.

I almost always solder from the top of the fitting. No bottom access required. The solder will flow to the bottom with a mix of gravity and capilliary action. You need a big torch, especially if the fitting is bigger than 15mm. Tiny little paint stripping Taymars are rarely satisfactory.
Christian.
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If you can get all the water drained from it, apply flux all round the joints, heat and add some solder. And check it really has flowed properly.
If you can't drain all the water, you'll have to take it apart and start again - you won't get enough heat to melt solder with water present.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Kevin wrote:

(i) there may be a leak much higer up (ii) it may be simple condesnation (iii) if you are in a hard water area, it may stop by itself.

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You might get a temporary fix with Fernox leak sealer. Turn off water, dry things as much as poss, smear LS over the joint & try to work it into the crack. Leave for an hour or so, cover with duct tape. LS is bad for skin, use rubber gloves.
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