Shower Pump sizing

This may appear as a re-post -- Apologies, the original seems to have been lost and I can't find it or replies on DejaNews.
I'm about to get a shower pump for a 'panel' unit with body jets: insts. read that it requires 1.5 bar for good performance, but I also want to connect the pumped side to H&C bath taps which at present are lamentably slow (not furred up, newish copper). Looking at the ads. and websites the 1.5 bar units with twin impellers mostly look 'plasticky', whereas the 2.5 and 3 bar units at least have brass inlet and outlet fittings. I *assume* this is good for reliability and performance, am I right? If I go for a 2 bar or above unit, do any of them have adjustable pressure which I can fine-tune after installation?
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Dunno, bought a single impeller unit from Wickes for the last house. It lasted for over 7 years, after that I moved so I don't know how it is coping now. I recently bought the cheapest Screwfix model and it is more than adequate. I could have paid up to 400 for models from the likes of Whale and Jabsco who make units capable of pumping seawater, but I don't see the point. If this one breaks down, I'll fit another (cheap) unit.
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recently bought the cheapest >Screwfix model and it is more than adequate.
This used to be my prejudice but I'm begining to worry that've got it wrong. I had a Wickes 100 job that lasted a couple of years before one of the dynamic seals failed. Then a Screwfix similar which lasted ~ 3 months before the same failure (free replacement of course). I put in a polyphosphate softener before the new unit, and that's now misbehaving after 3 months (noises, temperature fluctuations). I do have inlet filters and they are not blocked.
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The main advantage of brass pumps, is that they are more tolerant of over tightened compression nuts. Plastic pumps IMO have a greater tendency to leak as a result of vibration. The Wickes plastic pump I originally installed is still running after about15yrs, but it was built by Stuart Turner. The new pump is brass and waiting for summer to be installed. The only faults I've had have been a few minor leaks around nuts (and once around a seal) and the perpetual failure(every 6 years) of the plastic covered magnets used to operate the flow valve. I believe soft water helps reliability. The flow switch magnets can be rebuilt with a little patience and a suitable collection of junk plastic pieces. Spares for these are frequently not available. Stand the pump in a plastic sump, it can save a lot of floor drying out!!
Regards Capitol
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Hello mutley

Seems to vary wildly and I understand and even share your confusion. Panel units are getting popular now, but input pressures vary hugely. Minimum of 1.5 on some, others demand a minimum of 3 bar! Most have a maximum of 10bar.
I went for a 3 bar one, but not fitted the shower yet so unproven. Tests very well though.

Not all. Mine has plastic inlet and outlet. But it's pushfit so doesn't matter.

Mmm... Might be an indicator of built quality, but I'd say plastic on its own is in itself a problem.

Not as far as I know. Common thinking amongst manufacturers /seems/ to be "if we make it as powerful as possible, they won't complain".
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