shed design

I'm getting tedious about my shed now and I know it too well. I've only just covered the electrics!
I'm basically exyedning my existing shed and changing the roof style from a V shaped apex to a sloping 'pent'.
Next questions I'm pleading for help with is:-
Do I need special plywood for the roof? I'm going to prime it and then use special mastic for bonding the roofing felt to the wood - as the wood is covered does it still need to be special wood?
What sort of joint would you recommed for 3 pieces of wood 2 pieces at 90 degree angel and the 3rd going vertical, basically the corner of the shed with an upright. It's obviously requires a decent join but not sure which one.
Finally, (sorry, sorry), the shiplap. What would you recommed to treat it from bare wood with. I've going to look into pressurised treated shiplap wood (toungue and groove) but the cost could be fun.
Any thoughts for someone going bleeding derilious over his shed is truly welcomed!
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On 20 Jan 2004 12:49:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@tiscali.co.uk (mp) wrote:

WBP is a good compromise between cost and tolerating moisture.

I think that it's better practice and in the event of a leak in the felt, the wood will hold up longer until it is convenient to repair it.

There are numerous ways, but a common one, which I've used is to construct slightly differently as follows.
Let's say that you have three walls joining at 90 degrees.
Make a frame for one using horizontal timbers and adding vertical studs at each end and at intervals in between say 400mm apart. You can butt join the timbers and glue and screw.
Make a second frame in the same way which will be facing the first.
Make a third frame in exactly the same way for the wall to be in between and at right angles to both of these but make it shorter by the depth of two studs on the first two frames.
If you want more rigidity, you could put in additional timbers at an angle between studs, but with cladding it probably isn't necessary.
The third frame can now be fitted between the first two and you can attach them together using coach screws or coach bolts. The result will be very strong.
This method has the advantage that the frames can be made and even clad away from where you are making the shed. Also, if you ever need to replace a damaged section it is easy. I used this technique a few years ago to make a narrow, long shed in an awkward space. I made the floor in sections this way and also the walls in 2m lengths. All I had to do then was to fit them in place and bolt together.
For the extra couple of bits of timber needed to do it, the result is a much better job.

It depends on what you want it to look like. As a minimum I would use a good solvent based preservative and on all surfaces. I used Cuprinol clear stuff which has the advantage that you can go over it with other finishes.
On a recent garden building I used Jotun Trebitt and Demidekk coatings which are a semi-opaque. These can be obtained in a wide variety of colours and are not the garish limited range seen in garden centres.
I sprayed them, but they can be brushed as well. 3 coats are needed, but the results will last at least 8-10 years in good condition. Cost is about 10 a litre or so.
There are numerous other products like Sikkens and Sadolin which come in various grades and types but a more limited range of colours. On new wood, the recommendation is to use a coat of the thinner type of product like Sadlin Classic and then either repeat or use one of the more viscous types like Sadolin Extra on top.

.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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mp wrote:

Hi
I used water resist flooring chip, which interlocks nicely to give a strong, level surface. I covered a 12'x8' shed like this.

I used a layer of shed felt (unbonded) as a base, followed by the Onduline bitumen corrugated sheets available at Wickes, Homebase, etc.

This is putting a vertical riser into the corner of the shed? I'd go floot to ceiling with the riser and put coach bolts through from the outside, dilling clearance holes into the shiplap.

I used bare 3/4" nominal shiplap, coated the boards all around, put the shed together, then gave the outside a further coat. But this was when spirit based preservatives were still available, which I (perhaps illogically) 'trust' more.

HTH IanC
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Spirit/solvent based ones still are. It's just creosote that isn't.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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mp wrote:

I used 1/2" WBP on mine - gave it a couple of generous coats of cuprinol first.

The WBP is pretty water resistant (the offcuts I left laying about outside for a year showed no signs of delaminating or any other problems.

Depends a bit on how you build your stud work. I built each wall using butt joints with a couple of 4" screws into the end of each noggin (I was using 2x3 framing). When the stud work walls were made I then screwed them together at the corners. Half a dozen 4" twinthread screws gave a really solid fix.

Ordinary 3/4" shiplap with coats of cuprinol seems to do fine.

Not sure how relevant it will be to your erection (oh err!) by my whole shed construction saga is recorded for posterity here:-
http://www.internode.ltd.uk/workshop
There are also links to the plans I drew and the materials and tools lists.
(and you thought you were a sad shed anorak!)
--
Cheers,

John.

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Many thanks to you all for your help it's most welcome and now I can sort that dman shed out.
Special thanks to John and his step-by-step website, brilliant!
Matt
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