Self Levelling Floor Compound Newbie help...

Hi,
I am in the process of putting down a swanky new laminate floor. However to my dismay, I have noticed the concrete floor I am to be laying it on is not level. Using a piece of string, the floor dips to about 1cm in the middle.
Having bought a bag of self-levelling compound, I am going to attempt to level this floor out. Being a complete DIY novice, I have a few questions regarding this:
1. What exactly does self-levelling mean? Will the compound automatically fill in the dip when laid or do I have to make sure it is level myself?
2. If so, do I therefore put more of the compound in the dip and less as the sides?
3. How can I tell the floor is level once the compound is down? Is the string method the best way to check this?
4. The packet mentions to only lay to a depth of 5mm, will I have to do a second layer to make up to 1cm?
5. Should I leave this to a professional?!
Thanks for any advice...
Neil.
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You need to level it yourself but a length of straight timber (or, better still, 6" contiboard) is all you need. Getting the surface flat is the main thing. It doesn't have to be spirit-level level.
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main
Life gets much easier if you seal the concrete with dilute PVA before you start, otherwise the screed sets/cures too fast.
Dave S
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Dave wrote:

That is iunderstating. PVA is essential.

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.co.uk (Neil) wrote in message

Would recommend you search uk.d-i-y archives on google for this; it often comes up and you'll find plenty of useful tips. Eg, surface preparation beforehand...
David
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