self build conservatory - glazing question

Hi
I'm building a softwood conservatory and want to use double glazed units for the roof.
the question is ....
how do I constuct it so that the roof units are covered all around the seal and prevent slippage of the units. I'm referring to the bottom edge of the units that overhang the guttering.
???
Flashing ? Joinery ?
Any thoughts appreciated.
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What are you using as a seal between the glass and the timber frame ? Are you using routed timber joists and clips ? What type of glass are you using ? Are you aware that there are regulations in force, that actually specify the type of glass used for this type of construction ? Do you know that drainage of surface water also comes under regulation ? What type of foundation is the structure standing on ? Is the glass supporting any of the weight of the structure or is the timber the only solid support with the glass being suspended from it ?
Need more input as to what you are actually thinking of doing, as there are so many types and techniques for this kind of structure.
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EPDM - sealed unit - EPDM with hardwood capping screwed through to the joists

4-10-4 hardened both sides

Yes Yes Concrete Footings

Glass sits on top of 6x3 joists.
Attached is a rough diagram of the problem area
Any ideas?
TIA
Nicholas
On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 23:46:38 GMT, "BigWallop"

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So the whole thing is supported on its own. Great.
If you're putting hardwood ridge timbers along the seams of the glass, then a smear of sealant will act as a glue to hold the units in place and then the ridge timbers cover the edges. You could fit small blocks of timber at the bottoms of the joists to sit the corners of the glass against. Alternatively, a length of quarter round timber along the horizontal support with a squirt of sealant between will also keep the glass units in place. The ridge timbers will then allow any surface water to flow off over the top. Remember to allow for expansion on all the seams by using a flexible sealant solution.
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Did a bit of surfing and came up with another solution.
the top pane of glass on the units is 65mm longer than the bottom pane (and spacer bar) ...forming a drip. the bottom pane and spacer bar then sit into a groove/rebate in the ring beam thereby holding the unit in place preventing slippage.
how does that sound to you?
only problem I can forsee is that the spacer bar is exposed to UV. this could be got round possibly by sticking on a flat covering (plastic?) which would allow for water runoff
TIA
Nicholas
On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 21:09:33 GMT, "BigWallop"

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Oh no there isn't. Most ISPs won't accept pics to a newsgroup. Put it on a website and post the URL.
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If it is polycarbonate then I used retaining clips at the bottom, they were screwed to the wood and pointed upright so holding the sheeting which had a sealing strip along the bottom edge. Even with this there was quite a bit of expansion and contraction and over time the sealing strips distorted. Also the sheets pulled away a little from the wall at the top end so yearly I had to check the flashing.

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