Securing shower arm/head to wall

I have an interesting situation with a shower kit I`ve just bought. The shower can be seen here: http://www.hudsonreed.co.uk/loadbuy5b/1/A3097A3217/sh/sh04.html
The shower valve itself is easy to fit to the wall (has holes for screwing to wall). The shower arm and head on the other hand could be a problem as they are quite heavy (and would be more so with water in them). The kit comes with a 15mm to 1/2 inch compression elbow. which connects the 1/2 inch shower arm to 15mm copper which would run to the valve (inside a stud wall). What I can`t figure out is how to secure the shower arm to the wall. If I just used the elbow without any other fixing surely the arm would flop hopelessly towards the floor because of the weight. I had thought about using a wall plate adaptor (like the type used for garden taps): http://www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?ts9626&id 416 and a 1/2 inch straight compression coupler to join to the shower arm. This would provide more strength but I still don`t think this would be enough to hold the shower arm horizontally without gravity taking hold. How have others tackled this problem? - even the manufacturer can`t help!
John
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The last shower of that type I did was through a solid wall with the plumbing on the other side from the shower cubicle, and I pushed the tube through the wall and glued it in with lots of gripfill.
If as you say it's to go into a stud wall I'd be inclined to dig out the wall, bung in a nice thick nogging, drill a 15mm hole in the nogging and push (and glue) the pipe into that (with compression elbow on the back of it to connect to the shower valve).
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... however, if anyone twists the tube coming out of the wall (easy to do since the shower head is easy to grab hold of and move sideways) they'd break any glue joint and loosen the compression joint. (That wasn't a show-stopper in the install I did as the joint was still accessible). If the tube is chromed copper I'd solder it into an elbow behind the nogging, which should mechanically secure it as well as being the correct sort of joint to use in an inaccessible location.
You might be better scraping the chrome off the copper before soldering.
And you'd probably want to fix the nogging into the wall _after_ doing the plumbing joints!
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