Secondhand washing machine motor

Hi all I'm looking to use a 2nd-hand washing machine motor to power some lapidary equipment. The last time I did this (quite a few years (decades!) ago) ISTR that the motor we used had very simple connections - as in LN & E.
While fixing the pump motor on our current washing machine the other day, I noticed that the main motor on this one has what looks like 4 wires going into the motor - and an outboard capacitor (or 2) - possibly motor start caps ??
Our local scrapyard is just up the road in the next village - but I just wanted to check with the group on the following points :-
a) What's the usual connection arrangement for washing machine motors nowadays - if the additional cables are for alternative speeds then all I need is 1750rpm
b) When disembowelling a washing machine to get at the motor, how much of the 'peripheral' bits do I need to collect in order to ensure a working setup.
I realise that the precise details may vary between manufacturers and models - but generic advice would be appreciated.
Thanks in advance Adrian Suffolk UK
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wrote:

I'd avoid it. Washing machine motros are weird and uncased (cost-cutting and the need for multi-speed reversibility). You can find much simpler motors to use.
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HI Andy

Thanks for the comment. Any idea 'where' I could find these 'simpler' motors ?
Thanks Adrian Suffolk UK
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wrote:

An industrial scrapyard. Old factory machinery has load of motors, and you can often find variable speed stuff. It's also more likely to have been made and sold as "a motor", rather than only ever being intended for one specialised use.
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HI Andy
Thanks - good thinking...... it's just possible that my 'local' scrappie might have something - now I know what to look for !
Thanks for the guidance
Adrian Suffolk UK
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Hi Peter

Aha - so the technology _has_ moved on... thought it might have!

Sounds less than straightforward... Funny - all the references on the web seem to refer to 'second-hand washing machine motors' as though they're simple to use....

OK - thanks - I'll see if I can find copies of those books in the Library.
Many thanks Adrian Suffolk UK

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wrote:

If they are American sites they will - most American washing machines are rather large, crude, toploaders driven by induction motors - which are the 1400 RPM devices you were thinking of with no control gear.
--
Peter Parry.
http://www.wpp.ltd.uk/
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HI Peter

OK - that makes sense! So the control gear is for speed regulation ..? I've reserved the two books that you mentioned from the Library - thanks for the 'lead'...
Would the controllers lend themselves to creating a setup with _variable_ speed - or do they just do 'fast and slow' ?
Thanks Adrian Suffolk UK

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I think most washing machines in last 20 years would have more control than 'fast and slow'. Microprocessor driven ones will have a tachometer and variable power input to achieve a desired speed. However, some of the speeds may use different windings - mine has a separate set of field windings for, I think, only the top spin speed (1400RPM at the drum, very much more at the motor). I had a wire break supplying the standard field winding, but the top spin speed still worked OK.
--
Andrew Gabriel

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wrote:

Try the "motors" section here http://www.owwm.com/FAQ/Default.asp
A particularly useful explanation of single -> three phase conversion, for those with big machine tools to drive.
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Hi Peter

Oh yes please! - I'd like to see the pdf's. Noise isn't a major consideration, it's not like a 'tumbler' motor that'll be running unattended for long periods of time.
Whilst I appreciate that the washing-machine motor may be the 'long way round' - I guess there's likely to be a lot more of this type 'available' than there will be 'proper' motors.
I guess the scrapyard option is a bit of a lottery as to which machines were scrapped because of defective motors <g>... or do they generally 'die' for other reasons ?
Thanks again Adrian Suffolk UK

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If the load you intend is not to large why not try tumble dryer motors they run at a constant speed and some reverse so you can get the right direction you need I think they are cap start induction motors!!!!! If you want a washing machine try philco they had some massive induction motors on them two sets of windings wash which could go in either direction and spin which was faster.
Rich

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Hi Rich

Now that's a thought..... tumble-dryers. The power required for my little setup is not enormous - about the same as the average bench-grinder, I'd imagine. In fact - that was another possible route - I've seen such a setup powered by a cheapie bench-grinder with the wheels removed and a pulley put in their place.
Another alternative is a friend of mine who has 'sheds' like you wouldn't believe..... and thinks he has a couple of motors 'kicking around' - so I'll pursue that possibility first.
Thanks for the suggestion though..
Adrian Suffolk UK
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