Screw Fix delivery times

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If you asked for the goods, then it doesn't come under the regulations, whether you pay after delivery or not. If the goods are delivered without asking for them, and then they ask you to pay for them despite them KNOWING that you didn't order them, then it does cover it. The situation where some customer services monkey asks for money after a genuinely accidental delivery is probably a grey area that requires a lawyer to sort out.
This law is not intended doesn't cover accidental deliveries. It is to stop companies having a business model where they intentionally deliver goods that are not wanted and then attempt to extort sufficient money with threatening letters to old grannies to cover those that keep the goods and make a profit.
A friend of mine got some free goods the other day. A salesperson came around with a bunch of samples and left them on the reception desk with an order envelope, despite being told not to. They asked the company to remove them immediately. They didn't. So they kept the samples as unsolicited goods.
Christian.
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"Christian McArdle" wrote | This law is not intended doesn't cover accidental deliveries.
AFAICS it does, and unsolicited goods do not immediately become the recipient's. The recipient can inform the sender and request the goods to be removed, which the sender must do within 30 days of being informed, after which time the goods become the recipient's, or the recipient can keep them for six months without informing the sender, but must keep them safe and not use them, and return them to the sender if requested to do so within the six months, only after which time do the goods then become the recipient's.
Now, if Screwfix or anyone else can't track their deliveries for six months I think it's perfectly reasonable to enjoy a freebie, but if after 5 months they say "we sent you some things in error can we have them back please" then AIUI you have to return them to Screwfix. (Especially if you signed for them!)
If half a dozen No.6 x 1" screws come through your letterbox without explanation then you might not wait for the full six months; you might think it was a free gift or a sample or an apology for the last lot of poor service or whatever (and I think this applies to the agents who put catalogues through your letterbox and then come round and ask for them back if you don't buy anything) - the law does not concern itself with trifles - but if you order one SDS drill and six materialise, you know perfectly well they're not yours and to pretend otherwise is dishonest.
Homily over :-)
Owain
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IANAL. The law has since changed. I believe that unsolicited goods may now be kept immediately. However, the specific law in question does not apply to accidental deliveries. These are covered in different legislation. You can only keep accidental deliveries if you reasonably believed that the goods were not sent in error.
Christian.
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On Mon, 1 Sep 2003 12:07:31 +0100, "Christian McArdle"

Since 31
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On Mon, 1 Sep 2003 09:38:48 +0100, "Christian McArdle"

Well what the regulations say is" if unsolicited goods are sent to a person ("the recipient") with a view to his acquiring them".... then certain things follow [1 & 2]. If you receive goods addressed to *you* at your address then it seems a reasonable assumption that the sender intended you to acquire them. If they are sent to your address but to someone who doesn't actually live there, then perhaps a mistake has been made and the sender *didn't* intend that *you* should acquire them.
[1] Since 31st October 2000, if you receive goods that you have not ordered then you can treat the goods as an unconditional gift and deal with or dispose of the goods as you wish. You have no obligation to return the goods to the sender nor to permit the sender to retrieve the goods.
[2] If the sender demands payment for the goods he is committing a criminal offence.
The Sale of Goods Act doesn't apply because there is no contract in place. The Consumer Protection (Distance Selling) Regulations 2000 (SI 2334) do apply. See Regulation 24.
http://www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk/si/si2000/20002334.html
Chris Ward.
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On Fri, 29 Aug 2003 10:48:04 +0000 (UTC), Maximus Glutimus

This can happen with any given courier they use in any given area, although this should be less the case with PF as they are not a franchise as far as I know. You need to specify not PF next time you order then see what happens. Eventually you'll find one courier who really works in your area, and then you'd do best to stick with them all the time.
When I order from SF now I always stipulate to be sent via Parcel Force as in my area, they are absolutely everything you could ever want, Punctual, fast, take good care of stuff and polite, more than this they are reliable, but it's HERE that's the big word, I'm sure they're dreadful elsewhere! Around here, ANC are slow and lynx are slow and reckless (destroyed order last time - pix available, but grim viewing!). However this is only for my particular area. As it happens Lynx don't have a franchisee in this patch at present so it's no wonder they are no good around here, by their won admission, they have agency drivers only here and they don't know the area at all most of the time.

Well good on them for that, they would be unlikely to be paying it anyway under the circumstances, so they may as well not charge you for it either.

I've had at least that myself with them, but then I do make a point of telling them who I want delivering it. Not everyone would, and on the times I've forgotten, I have not been as happy as I might have been! My fault entirely for not saying PF on the delivery notes section of the order page.

No, not really, they got a set of disclaimers in clear view about this. If you did, then you'd be trying it on really; you're not a chancer are you? ;O) Bye now! Slowbloke
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Maximus Glutimus wrote:

Like most other replies, I get very good next day service from screwfix. They now send an email when they dispatch so you should be able to tell where the fault lies. No consolation to you but I suspect the problem my lie with where you are requesting delivery and the carrier and not Screwfix's fault. A couple of years ago they went through a bad patch on delivery times (and packing quality) but they really have improved since then. Bob
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I place regular orders with SF. I live outside Bristol. Usually it's next day, sometimes it takes longer - 2, 3, 5 days one one occasion. Courier is usually ParcelFarce. Did you know that you can track when your order was despatched on the SF web site then take the ref no. to the ParcelFarce web site and find out where it is? Log in and go to your order record. Where it says Despathced on the right, click it. Click the link to track delivery. Or something like that.
W.

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On a phone order you can choose a delivery day; say order on Monday and specify a Friday delivery, it gives everyone a bit of leeway.
Personally I used to get stuff sent to work, only prob was our warehouse started sending me every Screwfix box that came in.
Toby.
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