Scarfing a Barge Board

A short section of barge board is rotting at one end, I suspect because the end section of guttering beyond the downpipe is leaking. Instead of replacing the whole 4m length is it acceptable to scarf a new section in place well beyond the rot? If so what ratio would people recommend for the join? Also I assume I need planed treated wood for the replacement, is this correct?
I am currently weighing up the options of hiring vs buying a ladder enabling me to get up there (5m). Any thoughts on this one appreciated too.
Cutting the joint holds no fears for me, my woodworking skills are well up to it, I've just never had to deal with barge and soffits beyond painting them before.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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they were a small business who had bought a number of towers for a (painting?) contract but the contract had fallen through. It was delivered by a landrover pulling a trailer, they had several to deliver the day they delivered mine.
I've since seen several adverts for towers at similar prices, mostly in local small ads. and such, I'm not sure where they come from but mine is well enough welded together and galvanised to make me feel safe working on it.
The ScrewFix ones are aluminium I believe and maybe aimed at heavier use (though I can't really see mine wearing out unless it's really abused).
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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

How much space does it take up when collapsed? I have very little reason normally to get up to that height so am reluctant to go to a tower for one job (I have to clear the guttering on the other side of the house too, easier to move a ladder than a platform). I have done a variety of things up a ladder, and other than spending time getting the ladder into the right position I don't see any problem in effecting the cut other than arm fatigue.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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into flat sections so can be stacked fairly easily.
Clearing gutters I do from a ladder too but anything requiring longer term work (painting, fixing aerials, repairing T&G I feel *much* safer on the tower. Falls from ladders are very common.
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You can hire a tower or ladder, it depends on how safe you will feel. Does the house have a slope just there? And can someone with the right equiptment do the job for the price of hiring whatever you choose.
Not being saddled with a ladder or tower means you will be a little safer from burglars.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Michael McNeil) wrote:

The area below is flat concrete paving stones, a good surface for a ladder, not so good to fall on though.

I intend both to lock it in place and to lock the building its in. Also you need to gain access to see the contents.
Peter
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Peter Ashby
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On Mon, 21 Jul 2003 13:30:59 +0100, "David Hearn"

Try Google and search for past threads on the subject. This link came up a few times: http://www.scaffold-towers.co.uk/ Minor details like adjustable locking wheels do just about double the price, mind !
I am contemplating buying such a thing. It worries me slightly that there are enough neds walking past from time to time that a tower might go walkies by way of amusement one night. Perhaps I am just being paranoid...
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"John Laird" wrote | I am contemplating buying [access tower]. It worries me slightly | that there are enough neds walking past from time to time that a | tower might go walkies by way of amusement one night. Perhaps | I am just being paranoid...
Be even more worrying if the neds help it go walkies while you're still on the top deck!
I'd get padlocks for those locking wheels :-)
Owain
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safer I think.
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snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote in message wrote:

But if your not confident at heights surely putting up the tower is not an easy task, I&#8217;ve worked from most methods of access, and find ladders perfectly acceptable providing you are not hanging off, performing contortions with a large electric drill. I did notice a guy last year install a safety line between two eyebolts and he tied himself to this seemed a good solution for safer two hands free work. I personally went for ladders from wickes. Rob
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (rob w) wrote:

Such a scheme had crossed my mind I admit, though since the board in question is firmly fixed in place I don't anticipate needing two hands. I intend to cut it with a tenon saw, not a powered one.

A visit is on the schedule for this evening.
Peter
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School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Scotland
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I have a Class 3 DIY ladder I bought from B&Q. It wasn't quite long enough for one particular job so I hired a Class 1 Trade ladder from HSS. There's really no comparison. The Trade ladder feels a helluva lot safer and is consequently much easier to use.
I'm sure the DIY ladder is perfectly good and meets all the relevant standards but, if you don't like being up 'em, then hiring (or biting the bullet and buying) a trade ladder is the way to go.
BTW, I think Class 3 and Class 1 have been replaced with European EN numbers now. No idea what Class 2 was.....
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (mike) wrote in

A couple of years ago I was looking for a ladder - and was amazed at the low weight limits of the B&Q ones (and, basically, any non-trade ones). Being a fat git, I was well over the limit so we got the cheapest trade ones - and they are much more solid than anything else we saw - and not that much more expensive.
What shocked me was that every shop was quite happy to flog these to me - amd I am obviously too heavy for them. And many had their limits marked in a way that was not easy to read.
I haven't checked but I think the EN regs provide higher weight limits.
Rod
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may be in (serious) trouble for a number of reasons:-
You'll need someone there with you to assist you and/or summon help (shouldn't ever work alone on a ladder anyway I know).
Unless you have a really good harness then you will suffer a lot just being suspended, it doesn't take that long to die.
Getting back to safety may be easier said than done even if you aren't injured by the fall.
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climbers know this and have strategies for getting off the rope quickly if they fall.

there's little point unless you have a strategy to avoid a subsequent slow death hanging on the end of a rope.
A proper safety harness will presumably, if correctly used, prevent you from falling off the ladder at all. This is the right way to make yourself safer on a ladder (or tower for that matter). Trying to save yourself "with a bit of rope" is not a very good idea I don't think.
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