Savaplug

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From this website http://www.msarch.co.uk/ecohome/tour.html

fridge/freezer, so naturally. They decided to find an energy-efficient and ozone-friendly model. It was also fitted with a SavaPlug which saves a further 20% on what is the most energy-intensive device in the house after hot water and central heating <<<<
Where can these plugs be obtained, are they expensive, and do they really save that amount of energy?
This house is being updated to near, or better, new house insulation levels - consuming as little energy as possible. The e.g., in best example in the country.
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I have no idea what it is, but you can be sure that it doesn't work. The fridge manufacturers go to a lot of trouble to get good energy efficiency so that they can put 'A' stickers on the things in the showrooms. If there really was a 50p device to save 20% of the energy for free, it would already be incorporated into the design.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

Erm...This is IMM you're talking to. You know, IMM, as in magnetic water softners??
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http://www.jsbusiness.clara.co.uk/eco-exmoor/products-small/savaplug.html
A while back someone in Iceland (the shop - not the country :) tried to sell me one of these.

and that was my argument in the shop. They seem to sell for about 20 quid IIRC.
Darren
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On Mon, 6 Oct 2003 13:58:25 +0100, "Christian McArdle"

These days, it usually is.
Savaplugs did work on old fridges, especially those where the door was regularly opened. Comparing fridge energy costs and their replacement costs, then there's a lot to be said for modern higher-efficiency fridges anyway.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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What were they? Some sort of anti-cycling logic?
Christian.
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Don't use logic with IMM. He believes every advert he reads.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

Must admit I was sceptical - not so sure now....
If you have a look at the makers web site:-
http://www.savawatt.com /
they have a case study PDF (here http://www.savawatt.com/pdf/howitworks1.zip ) that does give a fair amount of technical detail as to how they work. The plug seems to be a combination of a Power Factor Corrector and a PWM power controller.
The argument they state, is that the motors used (especially on smaller devices) are oversized so as to accommodate the high torque requirements at switch on from the stall position. Once the motor is spinning and at a steady state, you can use the PWM power control to reduce the power input into the motor. This should not impact the motors ability to run the compressor since it is oversized. This will give savings as a result of less power dissipation in the motor, and they also suggest that you get better efficiency from a more highly loaded motor than a lightly loaded one - the reduced power input resulting in an increase in the loading on the motor.
I don't know enough about AC induction motors to comment on the motor efficiency issues, although I can see advantages to having a power factor corrector on the inductive motor load.
As others have suggested - it may well be that some fridge manufactures already include such facilities in their compressor design these days.
As an aside: does anyone know if a domestic electricity meter measures real or apparent power?
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power factor, only the zero phase angle current is measured. If you have lots of devices with large power factor you effectively get free electricity.
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Tim Mitchell

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Well not really. It measures the actual power you consume, but doesn't make you pay for extracting it inefficiently through reactive loading.
Christian.
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It measures real energy consumed. You don't get charged extra for low power factor (except that will result in extra energy lost in cable resistance, and you will get charged for that energy lost on your side of the electricity meter).
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Christian McArdle wrote:

The general speculation/conclusion was that _very_ old fridges and freezers might save some juice this way - the plug is mainly just a diode IIRC!).
It is also possible that under normal conditions of service there is a small amount to be gained but that under arduous conditions (like the hot week in early August) the plug might actually interfere with the correct operation of the motor.
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Just ran a search on 'Google' and found they cost between 18 and 24. If they do work it would be some time before you got your money back. Also they look quite bulky.

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IMM wrote:

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It is not from a makers web site, and it woiuld be nice to know if others have the same results.
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A quick google search will probably throw up a number of suppliers. Think they cost about 20 - 25. As for the energy savings, I guess it depends on the quality of the appliance you fit it to. I would imagine that the Savaplug works by allow full power to be drawn to achieve the necessary start-up torque when the pump is stalled, but then limits it once the pump is running. Depending on the quality of the appliance, it may already be fitted with similar energy saving circuitry. Probably worthwhile if you have an ancient old fridge or fridge freezer, but with a modern, energy-efficient A-class then I reckon the savings would be minimal and the payback period make it uneconomic.
Cheers Clive
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The web site said they have an energy efficient fridge and a Savaplug.
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Also from the same website

(the most efficient rating) for both fridge and freezer cycles and uses a hydrocarbon instead of the more prevalent HCFCs as the coolant fluid. This model was a mechanically perfect slight second (note light scratch on front) so was reduced to 600 from 1000 from Roy Waring (Engineering) Ltd (tel 01777 870487). The combi-oven was 600 from the same place. The SavaPlug is a British invention which will save about 12 a year per unit and costs 25 from the highstreet. <<<
According to them this Savaplug works on a top line A rated fridge. So the Savaplug will pay for itself in 2 years.
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If you wrap a magnetic water conditioner around the mains flex, you'll even get an additional 20% reduction in energy usage, giving a total reduction of 40%.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

Not even IMM could get this saving.
80% of 80% is 64% hence the saving would be 36%.Maybe we should not confuse with him mathematics and science in one go!
Bob
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