sash windows

the bottm sash and cills of my sliding sash windows are in need of repair.The bottom rail of the bottom sash is hanging off and is in danger of leaving the glass fully exposed. One snap of a sash cord and hey presto- instant guiloteen. The cills are well 'weathered' bare of paintwork and veined. I would preferebly like to replace the cills and sashes, in order to retain the character of the buiding. i don't fancy replacing the complete windows as i dont want to spend loads of money on DG sash units. Anyone with experience of refurbishing their sash windows or any good UK sites that can give me some ideas. Even though I can fit uPVC windows I dont really like them.
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Mine still look good 15 years after renovation, and at least a couple were in the same state as yours. I used car body filler to replace *all* rotten timber and "re-faced" the good stuff with it too. Metal rods or dowelling across the joints have proved very effective. You can buy 3.5 kgs for about a tenner from auto repair wholesalers and, once you get the hang of sculpting with it, you can repair any part of the window. I used greased hardboard to get sharp edges and corners and by the time I'd finished mine I reckoned to do a pair of sashes in a day. Hard work but, as I say, 15 years on, and not even a re-paint.
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Hi jacob In you wrote:

Fascinating read. I've got four sash windows that need repaired. One does not open, another two only the bottom light opens, and on each one a sash cord is broken. The fourth window's top light is stuck open about an inch and the gap has been stuffed with newspaper.
A real state, but I'm totally skint and there's no way I could afford a joiner/glazier to come and sort it out. The other problem is that they are about 20ft up, and I'm not confident on ladders! A tower may be better, but the ground beneath is stepped.
Ho hum.... back to dreaming about fixing things again.....
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Fishter
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Fishter wrote in message ...

The beauty of sliding sashes is that you can do everything from the inside. Just take the sashes out, reverse them, and work on them at your leisure. You can hold them in position with a few nails and fix them at the most convenient height. Lots of hoovering in the bedroom but a whole lot better than being up a tower.
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Hi stuart noble In you wrote:

But now I'm looking for the holy grail of DIY. A quick, easy solution to 30yrs of gloss paint.
And my next question.... how to convince SWMBO that I am capable of fixing the windows ;-)) My most complex project to date is a tie between hanging a new door in a squint frame, and laying sheet vinyl in a single piece in a roughly Z shaped bathroom.
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Fishter
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Fishter wrote in message ...

On the bottom sash a power plane set to very fine indeed works a treat if you can secure it flat on a couple of workmates or something. Not quite so well on the top because the meeting rail is usually proud of the rest.

Try one window and see how you go.
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You can do a full overhaul on sash windows from the inside.
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*What happens if you get scared half to death twice? *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Heh heh. If you have my luck, any breeze will take the dust inside no matter how you work on a window or door.
--
*It was recently discovered that research causes cancer in rats.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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If they need servicing i.e. sash cords, freeing off etc then I'd take them out and do everything you can to them inside the room including paint preparation primer and undercoat. Then re-hang and adjust etc, if necessary make good any marks to paintwork, then finish off in situ with gloss, ladder of necessary. If they don't need servicing - old paintwork is best left on if possible. You could smooth it by sanding - 60 grit and cork block. Wash with sugar soap and paint as necessary in situ. In other words final paintwork is best done in situ as gloss takes some time to harden and will get damaged if bashed about a bit.
cheers
jacob
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