Ryobi 18v combi drill - anyone got one?

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My brother bought an entire set of cordless Ryobi stuff from Jewsons (think it was anyway) on an offer for about 340 or so.
Has a chopsaw/mitre saw, combi drill, reciprocating saw and other stuff, came in a large plastic cabinet store on castors with a flip top for the chopsaw.
From memory, I think it's a mixture of 24v/18v and has couple of batteries and chargers.
He was happy with it when I saw him last, he's re-building the kitchen in a currently rented house (an unusual arrangement, but then he's prone to these complex housing arrangements...).
My recollection as to the exact kit is a little hazy - I'm waiting for him to call me back today so I'll ask what is in it and what he reckons to it after the couple of months use that he's had from it when I speak to him and report back.
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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<snip>

<snip>
Just spoken to him.
It's all 18v kit, includes compound mitre saw, combi drill, reciprocating saw, torch and a circular saw. Was 300, but he reckons that was a special offer.
He's very happy with it all. Only downside is that he's worried about the drill because it's smoking under load and smelling of overheated windings, but then he's just admitted to using it to drill a 150mm hole through a wall using a diamond core bit, which seems to have caused the problems...)
He also noted that it was probably the same drill as the PPro one at 115 or so in B&Q.
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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Well, since he bought a complete set like this it's unlikely he has experience of decent pro tools.
I'm not saying they aren't excellent value for DIY, though. However, for things like kitchen work I'd have thought mains tools more useful - I can't see a circular saw doing much before the battery goes flat, for example.
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wrote:

Not quite - he's of a similar outlook to me (though normally rather more extreme), so has a fair smattering of industrial stuff around.
I'll find out how he gets along with the circular saw. He has a huge Makita with alloy baseplate and the lot, which I have borrowed on a couple of occasions. My thoughts are that this is slightly too big and heavy for frequent use which is why he wanted a smaller one, and the battery tool might have just fitted this gap for smaller cuts. He's most unlikely to use it for slicing up MDF panels though, which is where the Makita excels. Given the choice of buying just one circ saw, I'd go for a moderate sized corded industrial model every time, as I suspect he would also.
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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imitation Makita's. I am so in love with my 75 copy that I am thinking of getting one of the Maplin ones.
"What?"
Maplins are selling them for 40. I went around Argos and they want half as much again for mere 18 volt ones. This imitation Makita is ideal for drilling out mortice catches and I even used it to fit some maortice locks a few days ago. It needs to be charged up well though. 2 batteries drilled through 1 1/2 door locks. I had hung the two doors though; so how much power had that drained and I'd used the drill the day prior and not recharged it.
One excellent machine!
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Saw a kitchen fitter at work today using a Ryobi 2.1 kW router. I asked him what he thought of it, was it up to the job and was it well made. He had two 1/2" routers, the other being an ELU (DeWalt before takeover) at 1.8 kW. He said the Ryobi was certainly a pro tool and very well made, and as good as the ELU. He had the Ryobi for about 4-5 years. He tended to use the Ryobi because it had more power and sailed through worktops.
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I've been checking loads of reviews and been able to get the feel of some drills albeit with little battery power. Having spoken to many retailers I've ruled out DeWalt as they seem to have more trouble than is implied by the brand image and price. Makita get very good feedback. Bosch is middling. My own experience with Bosch has been some really great tools and some really rank ones like 2 previous mains drills that couldn't take any abuse.
I really like the feel of the Makita (esp the speed control which is the best so far) but want to check out a Panasonic before I finally decide.
Ryobi have also had very good reviews so it's not ruled out for the price. I did get the price wrong though - it was 170 for the combo of combi drill and saw.
The only thing that pee'd me off was seeing some Makita drills being made in China and still at premium prices. Surely the difference between the cost of production in Japan and China is huge? I saw one 12V DeWalt drill which didn't even state the country of manufacture. I looked over every inch of the drill, box and instructions to no avail.
Was thinking about buying online from the USA as the dollar is so weak to the pound but not sure whether the chargers are supplied 110 only and thus more hassle than it's worth.
All will be revealed soon.
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On 23 Dec 2003 05:47:15 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@iname.com (StealthUK) wrote:
.

I have had several Makita drill products for some time and found them excellent especially speed control at low revs which still maintains good torque.
Also, they have a broad range of products and the interchangeability between chargers and batteries is good so there is something to be said for sticking with a brand with cordless tools. The Panasonic products, especially the drills have been reviewed well in the U.S.

I would check spares availability. I've never had a problem with Makita or with DeWalt, although don't have DW cordless products apart from a screwdriver.

The labour cost is one element. Others are the design, the quality of the components used, the QA of the finished product and the spares backup, not to mention recovery on R&D. There is a big difference between sourcing a product from China withj indeterminate quality standards and badging it, vs. a product that is assembled there with known QA and components.

I've certainly done that and with tools it makes a lot of sense. It can also be cost effective to make a trip just to go tool shopping for a couple of days. Travel light and pack the tools as luggage for the return. This balances off shipping costs to an extent and you have 145 duty and VAT free allowance on the return.
At a rate of over $1.70 it is certainly even worth shipping if you watch out for the costs.
Generally chargers are 110v only, but this is no big deal. I have numerous 110v cordless tools and a few mains ones as well. All you need to do is to buy a yellow site transformer here (about 40) and a U.S. extension cord or multiway outlet. Chop off the U.S. plug and fit a yellow one to plug into the transformer.
The cost saving on a couple of tools easily pays for the transformer.

.andy
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(StealthUK) wrote:

Arte you serious? You are telling people,to take a flight to the USA to buy some power tools? That will buy a lot of PP Pro tools, like crate full.
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I said "can be". It would depend on what you are buying and the exchange rate.
As far as a quantity of PP Pro tools are concerned, I think the operative phrase is skip full.......

.andy
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(StealthUK) wrote:

And never run out of one either. One breaks, ditch it, and pick up another, and still have lots more lolly in the bank.
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.andy
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wrote:

I beg to differ.
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expectations.
I tend to follow the principles of John Ruskin and avoid disappointment.
John Ruskin, 1819-1900 Author, Critic, British Philosopher, Artist
"It's unwise to pay too much, but it's unwise to pay too little. When you pay too much you lose a little money, that is all. When you pay too little, you sometimes lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing you bought it to do.
The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot - it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it's well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."
"The Bitterness of Poor Quality Remains Long After the Sweetness of Low Price is Forgotten."
.andy
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wrote:

Thing were different in the 1800s. We now have throw away goods.
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It doesn't alter the principles of business.

.andy
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wrote:

It does. Those people,never thought that a machine could be thrown away if defective. And the machine is so cheap?? This puts maters in a different light.
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"The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot - it can't be done."
That statement is timeless.

.andy
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wrote:

IT can now.

It's time has gone.
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By definition, that is not possible. There is a cost associated with designing, manufacturing and supporting products of quality.
It has always been possible to buy cheap products, and that has not changed since the dawn of time. This is achieved by cutting corners such as design content, quality of materials, quality of manufacturing, adding gimmicks (mitre saws with lasers are an obvious example of this) and by not supporting the product.
There is nothing wrong with the consumer choosing to go for the second route if he wishes, but don't try to kid yourself and everyone else that the cheap product is equivalent in all ways to the quality one because it is obvious that it is not.
As far as tools are concerned, you only have to look at product reviews and it is extremely rare that cheap, private label products come out as best of breed. Sometimes they come out as good value for money - that's not in dispute - but best of breed? No.
We mentioned the Taunton 2004 Tool Guide recently ----
Bandsaws - top were Laguna and Delta, bottom were Ridgid (HD private label) and Grissly.
Biscuit Jointers - top were Lamello and Porter Cable, near the bottom Ryobi.
Circular saws - top were Milwaukee and Porter Cable, best value Hitachi
Cordless drills - top were Panasonic, Bosch and Milwaukee, bottom were Ryobi and Grizzly
Cordless reciprocationg saws - top were Porter Cable and Milwaukee
Pillar drills - top were Delta and Jet
Midsize Routers - top were Bosch, Porter Cable and DeWalt
This is quite conclusive.

.andy
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