RSJ/ Joist advice

With the blockwork nearly complete,The RSJ size is 254 x 146,(11"x 6 "1/2) and I would like to fit the joists(7"x2") inside the RSJ recess's instead of on the top.Do I bolt battens each side to make up the height? Can anyone advise. TIA Alan
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An RSJ is not designed to take the load in between the flanges - the load should go vertically on to the central web.
You should use hangers placed on the top of the beam, with a suitable packing (eg timber) between the flanges of the beam
dg

"1/2)
of
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Make the joist 11 x 2 do you mean? Why not bolt a 3 x 2 inside the rsj for them to sit on? For future reference do all the drilling before you stick it in place. I wouldn't know how far apart to bolt it. I imagine you'd be safe with them every metre. So how are you going to lose it in the ceiling?
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"1/2)
of
The whole point of installing an RSJ is for it to take the loading of the construction above it or hanging from it. The lack of bending qualities are what give it strengths. The full loading can be placed on the top of the " I " section which then spreads the loads through the upright member which doesn't allow as much bending to take place through the whole beam. But if you place the full load on just one of the small webs of the cross trims, then the web will eventually fold downward (gravity and weight equations) and the beam will fail.
If the beam has been rated as taking "that" set load, then it is across the full beam that the rating had been measured.
Ask your engineer to make the sums available to you and ask if your thoughts are viable.
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Don't go wasting your money on an engineer. Some of the advice here is more than a little ott. Consider the posts to the thread on caustic soda. 70 posts nearly and still going. Mutton heads.
If you are confident the building is timber framed, unusual I believe fot the date give, you should be prety safe whatever. Are you sure it is not just the battons holding the cladding on the wall you are looking at?)
If you havean arch, pretty unusual in a timber framed house (but who am I to criticise modern fads?) that too means you are safe. If you have a hole in your wall with a brick or stone house with no lintle or archway, you have a claim against someone.
Putting one in if you really need to, is no big deal. Really. Perhaps apiccie would help. (Or you could try mentioning caustic soda.)
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Crikey; some of the other replies are scary!
Isn't 254 10" ? If the beam is going to cross right across the new building consider having the top of the joists 25mm higher than the UB. That way it's fairly easy to get services from one side of the UB to the other. Drill the bottom flanges of the UB at 1m centres and countersink the holes. Fix a nice fat 90 x 70 to the inside of the bottom flange with huge wood screws. Notch the top corners of the joist to fit right in the flange and skew nail them in.
I am not an engineer though and I want a pint of beer if you use these ill thought out and next to useless instructions in real life. :)
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