RJ45 outlets

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Can anyone recommend a good source of such things at a reasonable price ? I'd like to wire up some rooms with Cat 5, but the price of some outlets is just outrageous. (Or they don't look too bad until you realise the face plate is priced separately from the punch-down block, and separately from any blanking plates, let alone the back box...)
Ideally, I'd like some small ones, or maybe an inline socket style, if possible, for surface mounting. Maybe something along the lines of a BT extension socket ? 1G is ridiculously big.
TIA.
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I always fit doubles. I think most of mine have come from CPC when I happen to be doing an order for other things, but I think B&Q are actually a little cheaper. B&Q do inline surface mounting ones too.
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On 20 Nov 2003 17:43:52 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Shame on me - I've bought more than a few patch cables there. Their web page provides the usual glum news. An RJ45 socket runs about 50p in bulk. I am essentially trying to wire a socket. They want 4 for a neater surface box (a small piece of plastic) and 3 for the keystone jack to go in it. Hmm, how much of a lash-up is a 2 coupler and a 50p crimped plug ?!
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Not the answer you wanted...but consider if you really need ethernet bearing in mind the following...
54MB wireless networking is now quite cheap 108 MB wireless access is now available You don't have to cut a single hole or do any chasing
Adrian
On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 17:29:41 +0000, John Laird

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On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 18:01:14 GMT, Adrian Sims wrote:

What is says on the box may not be what you get in reality. Then of course there are all security implications of wireless...
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Dave Liquorice wrote:

A notion perpetuated by those that haven't really weighed up the relative risks. Neighbours snooping your downloads, or vans full of hackers parked outside? You should probably pay cash for everything otherwise you might let others find out where you bank. PS don't mention any sensitive information when using a DECT phone.
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On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 20:52:20 -0000, Toby wrote:

The keywords being "relative risks". *You* might not carry sensistive information on *your* computer don't store any passwords or other account details, don't have records of financial transactions that may contain CC numbers etc but I would put in a class of your own, numbering 1.
99.9% of computers users out there are totaly oblivious to how their computer works. They just haven't a clue that plugging in a wireless connection to their PC could easyly open up it's entire hard drive and net connection to anyone else within range.
Yes you can take steps to make the wireless side secure from abuse and from being monitored but most systems do not come "out of the box" with those facilties enabled.

Don't be fooled into thinking you'd see some one parked up outside. The range on the bits of rubber supplied with most wireless LAN kit is pretty low but bung on a decent arial and the range increases enormousely. I know of links working over 16km, indeed this house has two links one 4.3km the other 3km...

I know of no kit that can track and decode a DECT conversation. Can you post references please.
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Dave Liquorice wrote:

Your opinion <--- a fair distance ---> my opinion. So be it... (But compare wireless to broadband out of the box)
The two brands / five models of kit we have put in this year, have all been secure out of the box, it would take positive action to render them insecure; they've gone on forklifts to the CEO's house. We even tried out the easy install disk that ships with one of the most popular products expecting to pick it to shreds, but it was v.good for the man on the street.
You are right about the long range antennae, and on the diy side it is quite easy to make your own that is good for a couple of miles, so if the hacker ditches his van he could get a home made spiral wire wound waste pipe mounted on a long stick and wander the hills pointing it at various likely targets hoping he's within the beam.
The most impressive antennae demo so far (still makes me smile) is a modern variant of speaking through two tin cans connected by string, except the 21st century version dispenses with the need for string!
Get two large tin cans, 4" diameter dog food cans are ideal and mount a suitable connector on the circumference near the back. Connect both to PC cards then get colleague to go to furthest end of carpark / industrial estate / 'over yonder', point tin cans at each other, fire up messenger / netmeeting and chat away.
We were fortunate to have an omni on the building to cover the warehouses on the ind estate, so great to point at from all over while tuning; plus the gsm engineers downstairs couldn't beat our per mile ratio.
The most infamous antenna on the web is the Pringle can, a great one can be found here. http://www.oreillynet.com/cs/weblog/view/wlg/448
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Toby.

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One of the advantages for wireless is you can often forget about buying a base station and ISP account -- you'll find the card works fine all by itself in many built-up areas...
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<aol>Me too</aol>
Wireless is a timesaver in installation terms; you pay for that convenience in a few ways. Up-front cost is one; hassles to make it less rampantly insecure another; no upgradeability for performance is a third. (Put in Cat5 or similar, use 10/100 MBit right now and Gbit some time later if streaming digitised video round the house becomes your bag. Yes, you need to replace the kit at both ends of the wire - though not all of it, as you can expect auto-negotiation to allow slow and fast to coexist, as it does now if you buy a switch rather than a hub - and prices have now come down so there's just no point buying a hub rather than a simple switch.)
For those who keep moving from one house/flat to the next, wireless makes good sense. For those who are doing the medium-term owner-occupier thing, or wiring for their small business, the flexibility of wired is almost always a Win.
HTH - Stekef
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On Fri, 21 Nov 2003 19:41:16 +0000, PoP wrote:

But you are obviously pretty well clued up about the risks and have the skills and knowledge required to lock, and keep locked, access to your system(s).
The vast majority of computer users out there simply do not have the skills and knowledge to secure their systems even *if* they realised they where vulnerable in the first place.
In the phone socket at the end of the drive analogy you have the one inside a locked steel cabinat with fully itemised bills that you (can) check so if some one does come along with specialist tools (croc clips) the chances are they won't more than 1/4s worth of free calls out of you.
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On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 18:01:14 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@a.com (Adrian Sims) wrote:

The way prices are dropping, wireless access points may well end up cheaper than wiring. At the moment, I am working on the cheap with a 20m patch lead which cost me about 8. I'm trying to work out how to wire it in for less than twice what it cost...
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Adrian Sims wrote:

Until you find that there is so much metal in your house that it doesn't work...and many things interfere with it...

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Like upstairs UFH with a foil reflector
CJ
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ChrisJ wrote:

Or even simply walls full of cat 5 cable :-)
Or radiators, or the fact you have metal lath render everywhere, or even as I discovered FOIL BACKED PLASTERBOARD.
I haven't tested it at gigahertz frequency, but at model plane 35Mhz frequencies, what should be 30 meters plus range, is less than 3 inside the house...

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On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 18:01:14 +0000, Adrian Sims wrote:

I can comment on both fixed wiring and wavelan.
First wavelan: put it in at my new rented house for the laptop's benefit. Server and my PC are adjacent so wired at 100Mbit/s. Got the D-Link Airplus Xtreme G 802.11b/g which is good for "marketing speeds" of 54Mbit/s which is as everyone knows, are total b***ocks as a useful indicator - actual speed of moving your data around (ie without the TCP/link layer overhead is more like 10-15Mbit/s, sometimes a bit higher. Anything claiming 108 MBit/s isn't following any ratified standard - it's bonding 2 channels together in a proprietry way. So one company's 108 may not play with another comapany's 108 device.
All said and done though, 54-15 is more than enough to play streaming video at good quality. Depends on your useage - you wouldn't want to boot your operating system over it though.
There's another standard called 802.11a - works in the 5GHz spectrum rather than 2.4 GHz - also 54 Mbit/s. Be wary - it's not the favoured standard - people are moving more towards "g" including Apple. It also has poor penetration of even drywalls (at work we tried this and 3 drywalls kill the signal totally, 2 degrades badly but just about viable).
Conversly, "g" seems to get through 3 walls and well down the garden at full stength so I'm happy with it - even with a DECT phone and dodgey old microwave on (latter since exploded, RIP :-(
Lots of folks have mentioned the security issues.
I live in a village cul-de-sac - I don't expect wardrivers regularly and I don't much mind if the neighbours or Joe Random borrow the signal occasionally.
If you live in a town, this is likely to be more troublesome. WEP security (the one any unit will do) is piss poor and hackable in fairly short times by someone with a laptop.
MAC address restriction is OK - simple to set up, nothing funky to do on the client PC. Can be got round fairly easily - but enough to put off the casual eavsdropper. Doesn't stop people looking at what you're up to though if they really want to.
And now there's WPA - which is better but support in software is fairly new (= might not work).
All in, I'm happy with Wavelan. If I were doing anything *really* sensitive, I'd a) not be using Wavelan and b) if I were, I'd be using additional encryption on the PC that GCHQ would have difficulty with - not to mention a chicken wire faraday cage roun the monitor and of course a tinfoil hat ;-o
Don't forget though, that your online banking and such like should be using HTTPS which give an encrypted connection from the web browser to the server regardless of transmission medium - so no need to worry about that.
On the wired point front, I got my CAT 5 (previous flat, was doing cabling for phones anyway) from B&Q. I used the Euromod plate range which allowed me to clip in a mixture of CAT 5 RJ45, BT phone sockets and even a coax socket for the TV. Alas B&Q seem to not do the Euromod range anymore - dare say CPC do. RS do, but RS are usually expensive.
HTH
Timbo
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is
You could try Solwise. www.solwise.co.uk Don't know how their prices compare but they were very competitive when I bought my kit a while back. They have a good range and the service I had from them was excellent. HTH Nic.
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wrote

to quite expensive).
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wrote:

Thanks for the pointers (and for the poster who mentioned Solwise too).
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is
It's standard to have modules, blanks and faceplates sold separately, although you can get complete faceplates that are non-modular. They're nearly all a standard size outlet though to fit standard back-boxes. RW Data, now called Hellerman Tyton, used to have what they called a window sill mounting outlet, designed for surface mounting and very slim. The link on their website (www.rwdata.co.uk) seems to bring up the wrong products now though so I'm not sure if they're still available. Wadsworth (www.wadsworth.co.uk) are a main distributor for them Hellerman Tyton so you could try them. Otherwise, try Mills (www.millsltd.com) or Mayflex (www.mayflex.co.uk) who all have plenty to choose from.
And by the way, you'll be looking for Cat 5e now, not Cat 5
Phil
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