Replacing a loop-in ceiling rose with track lighting

I'm going to be replacing a standard pendant light fitting with a flexi-track LV Halogen system. The existing fitting is a loop-in ceiling rose. The transformer on the LV lights is mounted on an inverted tray baseplate which attaches to the ceiling in place of the rose.
Which is the best way to replace the rose? Using choccy blocks in the void in the transfromer baseplate would seem the obvious way but would it be a better solution to cut away a circle of plasterboard and screw the existing rose directly to the joist, so it is recessed below the surface of the ceiling, and then mount the transformer over it?
Thanks.
Regards,
Parish
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wiring and rose. I would use the connectors option, and sleeve the leads with heatproof sleaving if it looks a little tight against the transformer. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Lurch wrote:

Sorry, guess I didn't explain it too well. Here's a pic of the fitting
http://users.uk.freebsd.org/~mark/foo/fitting.jpg which, as you can see, doesn't have a lot of room for choc blocks (the lip is 10mm high). The rose on the other hand is about 15mm high, without the cover of course, so if the plasterboard were cut away and it was screwed to the joist, it would be be roughly flush with the face of the ceiling, giving 10mm clearance to the plate. Plus, I could do it without removing all the wiring, except to replace the cable to the fitting since it needs an earth and the existing one is only two-core.

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You could reuse the rose as you suggest. Though if I had acess to the space above I would use a BESA box ( a round plastic conduit box) Though these are deeper and would have to be fitted onto a piece of wood behind
--
Chris French, Leeds

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access to above the fitting a junction box would be better. From there drop a length of heat resistant flex into the fitting. Although you could do what you suggest I personally wouldn't, it's still a little close to the rear of the transformer. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Lurch wrote:

OK, thanks for the help, I'll use connector blocks although I must confess I don't understand why the rose would be "still a little close to the rear of the transformer" when it will be a good 10mm, probably more, away yet connector blocks will be sat on the transformer mounting plate so will get even hotter - or is heat not the reason? If not, what is the reason? I'm curious as I don't understand; I'm not questioning your advice. Actually, the only reason I asked was because of the other thread, "choccy blocks" where someone said their use had failed an NIC inspection and people were debating the thermal issues.
thanks again.
Parish

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above the plasterboard. Then they are a good distance away, and behind a sheet of plasterboard. Much better all round. ..
SJW A.C.S. Ltd.
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Lurch wrote:

Duh! Yes, of course. Thanks again.
Regards,
Parish

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