Removing varnish from kitchen units

Hi everyone I recently moved to a house with a fitted pine kitchen which although in good condition is a bit orange, which makes it look dated. Does anyone have any tips about removing the varnish? chemical or some other technique.
Once it's varnish free what is the best thing to seal the wood? I'd like to keep it as natural as possible.
Any help welcome. Thanks
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It's definitely solid, had to think there for a second though. I did think sanding for the bigger areas but some of the edges are a quite ornate and I don't want to lose the sharpness of the edges. Are any of the chemical removers any good and save to use in the kitchen?
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On 25 Aug 2003 01:56:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (pink digit) wrote:

Nitromors is pretty effective. It does give off a vapour, however, and you therefore need to ventilate the room while using it - not as bad as wood preserver, though.
It will also burn skin after a short while if you splash any on yourself so it's advisable to wear gloves - however if you wash splashes off, it is neutralised immediately.
Basically the procedure is to paint on liberally, paint on a bit more when it dries and then after a while scrape gently and wash off with water. Repeat if needed.
It is safe in a kitchen as long as you make sure you wash off the areas of use properly.
.andy
To email, substitute .nospam with .gl
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On 25 Aug 2003 01:56:30 -0700, pink digit wrote:

Chemical removers will work, but best take the cabinets off the wall otherwise it will get very very messy very very quickly! Ensure the chemical removers won't weaken any glue points in the units.
If sanding ornate corners, just do it by hand or use one of those small 'mouse' style sanders and don't apply too much pressure.
Sanding will give a "rustic distressed look", whereas using chemical removers will only change the "shade" of the wood.
Whatever you choose to do, test on a hidden bit of a unit (perhaps inside a door) before committing yourself to your chosen course of action.
Regards, Steve
--
Jack of all trades, master of some

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