Removing Cork Tiles

Can anyone advise as to the best way to remove cork tiles from a bathroom floor?
They've been down for quite a number of years. (It's not my house, so I don't know exactly how long.)
TIA
--
AnneJ

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well sharpened garden hoe.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Anne Jackson wrote:

Try heavy duty floor scraper, Screwfix have example. Even then its bloody hard work. I just removed same from daughter's concrete bathroom floor. Took me >4 hours. In the end was also using flat prise bar and hammer to get off the difficult bits.
In my own bathroom which is chipboard flooring, I decided to leave cork tiles in place as it was nigh on impossible to get them off without damaging the floor. I just made sure they were reasonably level, even replacing a couple, and laid laminate over them.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What are they laid on ? If someone put down hardboard first, you need merely prise up an edge and lift it in sheets, pulling up the pins later (they will be left behind most likely). If they are directly on chipboard or (intake of breath) floorboards, try a garden spade with a thin edge. I'd imagine the glue will leave a horrible mess behind (that's why hardboard is usually recommended).
--
Don't steal. The government hates competition.

Mail john rather than nospam...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, you've guessed it...he laid them on the existing floorboards!
I don't think he'll ever make that mistake again....
--
AnneJ
ICQ #:- 119531282
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I don't think I've ever owned a house where the floorboards looked even remotely flat enough to take a tiled covering. The ones in my bathroom are not even flat enough for hardboard, but short of removing every single item in the room and emptying the airing cupboard, they can stay there...

Please administer the clue-by-4 gently :-)
--
Conclusion: the place where you got tired of thinking.

Mail john rather than nospam...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Unless you know what you are doing with harboard on the floor ou are best off not using it. It needs to be wetted enough to expand so that when it dries it pulls tight on its tacks. Otherwise it will buckle terribly. Wetting it is a right sod to do too. A garden hose and a fairly stiff broom is required.
--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 10 Nov 2003 21:31:05 +0000 (UTC), "Michael Mcneil"

Sounds like a faff. I've usually just left the sheets nearby to come to the same humidity level as the house, and employed *plenty* of nails. It's not going to buckle much if it's held down every 6" or so.
--
I'm busy now. Do you mind if I ignore you later?

Mail john rather than nospam...
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had this task a couple of years ago and it was a real pain. Like yours someone had laid mine on straight onto floorboards. No the floorboards weren't flat enough but it didn't seem to stop them.
I used brute force and ignorance (and a hammer and chisel) and it took me hours. Typically someone popped by just as I was finishing and told me of a real easy way. His suggestion was to pour white spirit on the floor and let it soak in overnight. Apparently it works a treat at disolving the glue. I'm not sure if I like the idea of pooring a flammable (and smelly) liquid all over the floor so if you do use this method you do so at your own risk. Perhaps try a little bit first to see if it works?
If you do try it, I'd be interested to know how you get on!
Martin.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.