Recycling - how do others cope?

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writes

Not at all - though possibly not phrased it very well on re-reading.

By referring to new trees being grown, I meant that as long as more tree's are being grown (to produce future paper) to absorb the CO2 released (in the long term) there is not A net change in the CO2 level in the atmosphere do to the paper being burnt (or otherwise decomposed for that matter)
--
Chris French, Leeds

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On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 17:11:35 -0000, Mary Fisher wrote:

Ah but only putting back the CO2 the tree used to make the paper/card absorbed in the last 30 years or so. It is *not* the same as burning a fossil fuel such as oil or coal where you are putting back CO2 absorbed millions of years ago...
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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mich wrote:

That would appear to be simple stupidity on their part (unless they have to make a journey specially). How about taking them when you go shopping anyway, or is there no recycling bin at your supermarket/local shops.
<pet rant> People who stop by the recycling bins at the supermarket, engines on, while emptying their car off bottles etc, before driving round to park as near the door as they can.</pet rant>
--
Chris
-----
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newspaper.
Its likely to take me more than a month ( and that will mean as much as six weeks hanging around waiting for collection day) to fill a sack with tins/cans etc as I dont use very many. I actually buy fresh food or grow it and the wrappers - plastic bags and film etc for that food are all non recyclable by the way (not my fault)
As for newspapers, that sack may take even longer to fill. I have few papers or suitable junk letters and most of them end up on the fire ( I have a coal fire). No mains gas where I live, and I have electric central heating. The only thing I can put into this bag is my home shopping catalogue ( twice a year). They do not take the yellow pages, that has to be taken down the supermarket or burned! Quite honestly the very selected thigs they take are a waste of time for me as I dont have many and I will be forever filling the bags

There is a third bag for old textiles ( clothes) but this bag is only for selected items and you have to wash and dry them first!
So, my old clothes, which never get cast off before being ripped or beyond redemption, will still have to be bagged and taken down the amenity tip!
Additionally, all foil has to be put in a carrier and put out inside the tins bag. Jars have to be put out seprately in a carrier or box,( and where do I put those between time too? And all cardboard and brown paper has to be bundled and placed alone.
It would be easier to take it down the supermarket and put it in the skips. Frankly I think they are taking the p*ss with my time and effort- and without asking me first. And without thinking it through enough to suggest storage solutions for the bags and simply failing to recognise how inconvenient sacks over the kitchen floor are.
And they do smell , even with clean cans in. At least I can smell them, its a thickness in the air, a whiff of something not pleasant not a distinct dirty smell as such . Its hard to describe.
These bags were just dumped on the door step with a leaflet telling me I was now in a recycling area.
The council will collect old batteries? Not so here. Would that they did, might make it worthwhile. I have to take such things to the amenity tip - and thats where my other stuff ended up too as a rule if I got a pile up at all.
As for putting them outside. Despite the fact its all cleaned before binning, I still think it will attract vermin ( I live in the country , the vermin are in the hedge outside already. Its my hard paving, religious clearing of the area and gravel areas that keep them at bay already. Putting these bins near the house will simply attract the local wildlife and vermin catchers.
On the other hand taking them down the garden far enough away means lugging stuff down ( in cold and rain) and lugging it back out to the front when its collection day. And then, I will have to invest in /make some form of container for the bags. I can hardly leave them sitting about on the garden. When empty they will fly away, when full they will be a curiosity to the foxes and cats ( who love open bags as play things , and think can footie is a wonderful pastime by moonlight! <g>)
So , hopefully you see my concerns and problems.
Has no one else got this sack scheme? Are you all on wheelie bins/ plastic crates/ or whatever?
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Its noisy alright especially when the green plastic container is chucked back into the front from across the road.

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<snip>
What really confuses me is that they will accept glass bottles for recycling, but not old window/picture glass; plastic bottles, but not other plastic packaging (even when it's the same plastic!); news papers but not yellow pages/old phone books/junk mail.....?
Recycling is important, I do all I can; but the rules just don't seem to make any sense!
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other
I agree, it doesnt make sense. And why does junk mail go in with the newspaper but cardboard has to be put seperately?
Why take plastic milk bottles but not plastic lemonade bottles? There are so many exceptions.
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On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 15:54:38 -0000, mich wrote:

Different plastic for a start, milk bottles are HDPE, fizzy drinks PET. At least a large proportion of plastic has a recycle logo and a number/abbreviation to tell you what it is.
I wish our recycling box took plastic, that makes up the bulk of black bag waste.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
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Depends on where you live and on the exact scheme operating it seems.
In some parts of Leeds (such as ours) there is 'Green Bin' scheme for recycling.
We get a green wheelie bin as well as a black one.
In the green one we can put:
all sorts of papers, magazines, telephone catalogues etc. though not envelopes (something to do with the glue and the recycling process I think) and cardboard.
Plastic bottles of all sorts
Cans and Aluminium foil, etc.
They ask you not to put in glass bottle -I have a plastic box by the green bin that they go in.
It is collected monthly by what looks like a standard refuse type truck and taken to a sorting station (and in answer to a previous post - yes this place does exist - I've seen it)
While a pre-sorting system sounds good, I have to say, having taken part in one before, I do much prefer this from my POV.
I don't have to have different bags/boxes cluttering up the place - ok if we did I'd probably manage it ok, we have the space. But if I lived in one of Leeds many back-to-backs? It's bad enough then finding place for a wheelie bin.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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A daughter lives in one of those and has both green and brown bins. Space for them isn't too much of a problem because they have a small garden, which many Leeds back to backs have. Those who don't have to have the bins on the street - or in the old yards which were built to house lavatories and middens. I know because I was brought up in one of those - a scullery house now demolished - with the yard next door and spent the first years of our marriage - with three babies - in a one up and down straight onto the street but with a yard down the street, also now demolished.
One of our wheelie bins, while taller, has a very different footprint from the old dustbins. Its square format makes it more space-saving though.
You can buy wheelie bins in most parts of the country, I understand. That could be another solution to the OP's 'problem'. I suspect though that he wouldn't want to bother taking his rubbish to a bin.
Mary also Leeds and not far from

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Thats not actually fair. I would take the stuff out to the bin if I had room close to the house.
However, I sort of draw the line at having to buy three bins ( one for each bag) and from which I will have to remove the bag and lug it 200 yards down to the curbside. However, in my case it would have to be 600 years to the curbside as the nearest I could get the bins in would be 400 yards (at the end of the rear garden).
But I suspect your comment is based on your bias, not on the facts. Anyone who denies me the right burn paper on a fire on the grounds I am polluting the atmosphere would have to be biased.
I simply wonder what kind of ecological wonder of a home you live in, what kind of ecologically friendly heating and power source you have ( wind generation or solar panels perhaps?), who composts everything, has reed beds to convert their sewerage? Who puts out less than one black bag of waste for landfill a week, that you can criticise me without compunction.
At least I am honest enough to say I will not, rather than keep stum and not do it anyway. Most in my position would simply let you think they were wonderful recyclers. I am not. I will only do it if I am not inconvenienced too much and I can afford the outlay.
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You would't get far round here with a wheelie bin, we haven't got the right sort of dustcart
mike r
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Well I might resent filing up large parts of my garden with two wheelie bins (esp. as the black bin never gets anywhere near full unless I use to to get rind of stuff I might otherwise take to the 'tip')
I was thinking more of finding space for various boxes/bins/bags etc. for pre-sorting the recyclables
--
Chris French, Leeds

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Large?
But, Chris, we don't have that problem. If we did I'm sure I'd find a way round it - and so would you.
Mary

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Ok, a large proportion.

Yes, if I had a small house with a small kitchen, with a small garden or yard then I would probably end up throwing the waste away rather than arse about with various plastic bags.....
--
Chris French, Leeds

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<snip> (text recycled!) The company for which I work now have to (by law) design and pay for end of life products, this means we have to pay the recycling costs of all products we design and manufacture. Why don't supermarkets have to do the same, and take back the empties?
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Martin wrote:

Some of the equipment we buy is covered by that scheme as well and as 'they' keep banning more and more of the chemical parts it will become very expensive in a few years time for the original manufacturers to take it all back and try and seperate out all the nasty contents. Up till now we just paid the council a few bob for use of their landfill and chucked it in. I'm guessing that things like cars, TVs and fridges will be covered by it soon as well.
--
James...
http://www.jameshart.co.uk /
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supermarket.
including

I just put everything in the bin, as normal. If your local council are like mine and don't care about how your house suffers between collections, then why should you.

Sling them in the bin and forget the councils re-cycling targets that were set by this government.

long.
Dump them in the general waste from the house, problem solved.
I might add, I am a bit of a greeny at heart, but the way government/councils have put together their recycling procedures, I am deeply disappointed in the way they are going about their practices of recycling waste.
Dave
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wrote:

I completely agree. I went to the trouble of putting two waste bins in every room that HAS a bin; one for recycleble stuff (paper etc.) and one for everything else. This worked well.
Then the council changed the system, and made it impractcla. Now it all goes in one bin.
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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and on a slightly different tack...........opening a door twice on a very cold winter's day to deposit a tin can in the recycling box is going to lose a lot of heat from the house.......Is that energy effecient?
Mick
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