Recycling - how do others cope?

Page 3 of 6  
Owain wrote:

That's what I thought when I was out there.
--
Chris
-----
Spamtrap in force: to email replace 127.0.0.1 with blueyonder.co.uk
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

I think there is more to life's values than strict economics. Whether you think recycling is worthwhile just depends on your outlook on life.
I'm sure you are well aware of all the recycling arguments, but someone has to pay for the land fill, and if that cost can be put upon the producers (like supermarkets), then maybe they won't use so much of it and the goods may become cheaper.
Some hope....
Roger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And I don't. Economics is information, providing all the externalities are figured in. And in the case of recycling, that information tells us that by-and-large recycling domestic refuse is a waste of time.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes

But are all the externalities factored in? - in respect of the discussion here I suspect not.
--
Chris French, Leeds

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I agree, and on both sides. Are all those 4x4s driving down the bottle bank included?
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you sure? The problem is quantifying all those externalities in money terms. Environment is one of those externalities in the waste equation yet is hard to quantify in money terms.
A special sort of modern domestic refuse is abandoned and burnt out cars. Without factoring in the environment cost, the economics for the local authority would say they should be left there. However if they were around your home you might think there was more to life's values than strict economics.
Roger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 18:40:11 +0000 (UTC), Bluestars wrote:

Hear, hear.
Accountants: Know the cost of everything, the value of nothing.
Even if it does cost more to recycle in makes far more sense to me to do that than dig stuff out of one hole, use it once and stuff it back into another. 'Cause that first hole will, not if, will, run dry at some point in the future. Hopefully before the first hole does run completely dry the pure economics will make the use recycled materials more viable.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Precisely so. Once it become economic to recycle stuff, then it's entirely sensible. Until then, it's just a waste of energy.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9 Nov 2003 11:54:34 GMT, Huge wrote:

Depends how big you make the picture. Use of recycled materials reduces the demand for new raw ones, this delays the time when raw ones become uneconomic to use.
At present we still rely very heavily on raw materials and don't have the facilities or, in some cases, the technology to remove this reliance on raw materials. The time "bought" by using uneconomic recycled materials now can be used to develop the recycling infrastructure and the technology that *will* required in the future.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How many times do I have to say this?
NO IT DOESN'T!
I do rinse them. They are well clean by the time they get in the sack, but the sack still stinks. I can smell it. Its a thick , dirty person type smell , as if I've had a tramp dossing in the kitchen at night.
As for the vermin. Ive already explained that too. Foxes and cats like noting better ( just out of curiosity) than to get inside plastic sacks and nose around and pull the contents out. And mice scratch and bite the bags open just to see what they can find and to live in (especially paper)
I am in the country and I do have a "problem" in that mice are a natural part of life here. Given a chace they come in , especially in winter. The only answer ( and I one I was given here actually) is to keep all outside areas free of clutter and litter, hard pave or gravel rather than have garden near the house and thus keep them away from the house.
Putting sacks out is tantamount to putting up B&B signs for the local widlife population.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not all postings appear on the news server instantaneously. None of your other responses were visible on my server at the time I responded.
Roger
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OK sorry. I am just fed up of being chided because I have no place to put some stupid plastic sacks which are taking weeks to fill because basically I am not a *waste generating* person anyway.
One black bag a week and couple of newspapers , which get burned. Very little junk mail and thats it. I dont think recycling is a suitable proposition for me.
Im just better dumping and taking stuff or taking it to the amenity tip.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I sympathise, mich, it sounds as though you live near me.
My black bag is stores in the foxproof shed so it can stink that out - the pompous posters ignore the kitchen waste which the cat refused, or the offcuts of gristle or chook bones, or the fat which will choke either my arteries or the drains; which can only go in the black bag.
The recyclable, mainly lager cans, but the occasional milk plastic bottle, stay outside the back door, looking ugly.
On the bright side, I only put out a black bag once a fortnight now, but it's still all a bluddy bind
mike r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I woder if the people that make these rules think that the original raw-materials were 'clean'?
tim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"mich" wrote | "David Hearn" wrote | > > >So, how do people cope? | > > Simple. Don't bother. The vast majority of recycling schemes are | > > bunk. | > Local Authorities are required to significantly reduce the amount | > put into landfills. If people refuse to recycle, even when systems | > are in place, that's bad. Even if it costs the taxpayer more money, | > its still necessary as they have to recycle more and landfill less. | > Besides, if local authorities don't reduce landfill, they'll lose | > funding from the Government, which means taxes go up even more... ;)
But if the LAs lose funding from the Govt, local taxes might rise but central taxes should drop correspondingly, so the overall tax burden should stay the same. (It won't of course.)
| So much for the discussion about the importance or not of the ecological | issue but the reality is no one will recycle anything when it has to sit | reeking around a kitchen for weeks on end now will they?
The answer is for businesses to cut the amount of excess product packaging at source, and have all waste packaging returned to the retailer for re-use/recycle wherever possible. But they won't do that unless the Govt makes them, and the Govt prefers to put the burden on the individual householder.
If the Govt mandated the use of deposit glass bottles for all drinks that would reduce the plastic and aluminium that needs to be disposed of from milk bottles and cola cans, and a similar scheme should encourage brewers to reuse beer bottles rather than pubs sending them for cullet.
Owain
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[20 lines snipped]

Hear, hear. Couldn't agree more.

Same again.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where I am at present glass beer bottles have a deposit, but also plastic cola/lemonde bottles as well, (e.g., the 2 litre sort) so there is no need to change the packaging at all, merely! impose a charge and set up the recovery infrastructure. Here the supermarkets typically have a machine where you feed the bottles, plastic or glass, through a hole where they are electronically inspected, and a reciept issued that is honoured at the checkout till. These machines also have a small conveyor that will take a beercrate and the bottles, inspect them, and put the refund on the reciept. So crates, plastic and glass deposit bottles can all be automatically accepted. Somewhere in the back of the store these are kept for collection.
People here also separate the non deposit glass and paper and put them in at collection points. We have biological collection - green bin - and other - grey bin collection alternate weeks, and blue (paper) once a month. However to have alternate week collection without the bins would be rather nasty, the biological kitchen refuse plus grass cuttings etc get a bit off in the summer.
We also have a special smart ID card to use the local waste site, I am allowed 200Kg a week there. (you are automatically weighed in and out) This has been brought in because people from other areas were visiting the local site to avoid paying in their districts and could use the old dump for free. Some other local councils in the district have wheelie bins with identity chips in so they record how much you are putting into the system and charge accordingly.
Complex isn't it, with a big infrastructure. And, if you were wondering, this is Holland, only 120 miles away from the UK.
Eric.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Owain wrote:

Not quite... all this stuff on recycling, landfill etc arises from a battery of EU directives that have come into force over the last decade. The penalty for non-compliance is, potentially, unlimited fines of the member country, so the tax burden would rise and only the EU coffers benefit...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sigh. Pop! goes the benfit of recycling them.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
writes:

We have been told we have to clean them before putting them into the sacks, so from the uninitiated why is this counter advantagous to their recycling since thats the purpose?
I think rinsing is going to be a problem for my drains at some point with all the gunge thats now going down the sink plughole, and I am responsible for all the sh*t disposed of on my ground , it doesnt go into the mains sewer. I rely on land drains and septic tank.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.