Recycling - how do others cope?

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On 11 Nov 2003 22:24:22 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

You are making a rash assumption. During the next 500 years they might dig you up and pass your DNA over to the team that did Dolly the Sheep, then it remains to be seen whether you would consider yourself dead.
Time for a joke to lighten things up:
Remember last year when they dug up James Hanratty to see whether his DNA matched that found at the murder scene in the 50's? If the DNA hadn't matched they'd have had to give the DNA to the Dolly the Sheep team so that they could have a retrial and then let him go ;)
Fortunately the DNA did match so he did it for sure.
PoP
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On 11 Nov 2003 22:24:22 GMT, Huge wrote:

It happens already to some extent. Reworking of spoil heaps for a start. Then of course there are the old Victorian land fills excavated for the bottles/pots that they contain which are now quite collectable.
--
Cheers snipped-for-privacy@howhill.com
Dave. pam is missing e-mail
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finished
then
would
OK then.
I live in a small house with no front access to the back of it, unless I go through the house (I am second in a block of 6 terraced/town? houses). This means that all these boxes/bins must live at the front of my house. Incidentally, they will ferment quite well, as the sun is out there till well past mid day. However, I opted to have bin bags that I can store out of the heat..
When the house was built, (25 years ago) I had a cupboard at the front of the house that housed one of the 'old fashioned' bins. Now it houses the bin bags that I fill with my rubbish.
If I had one box for tin cans, another for aluminium cans, another for plastic bottles/containers, now another for cardboard, then another for paper, another for green waste, followed by another for un-recyclable waste. That amounts to at least 7 waste bins.
If all these bins were at the front of my house, where would I park my car on my property?
I have enough space to park 2, sometimes 3 cars side by side in front of my house, but should I start to charge my local council for rental space of their boxes and bins?
Dave
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Simple. Don't bother. The vast majority of recycling schemes are bunk. The materials are either sold at a loss, imposing a cost on chargepayers, in which case it wasn't worth recycling, or in some cases put in landfill anyway.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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writes:

supermarket.
including
Local Authorities are required to significantly reduce the amount put into landfills. If people refuse to recycle, even when systems are in place, that's bad. Even if it costs the taxpayer more money, its still necessary as they have to recycle more and landfill less. Besides, if local authorities don't reduce landfill, they'll lose funding from the Government, which means taxes go up even more... ;)
Recycling isn't meant to be a cheap alternative to landfill, its meant to stop us from polluting (large landfills with plastics which don't really decompose) and stop wasting resources (metal and plastics - plastics use petrochemicals which are a finite resource).
D
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writes:> > >It is not a tub or bin system like in other places I have been.

The
Government,
So much for the discussion about the importance or not of the ecological issue but the reality is no one will recycle anything when it has to sit reeking around a kitchen for weeks on end now will they?
If I put the bags out they get wet, rifled by foxes and cats and encourage mice whilst sitting around , not to mention I get wet putting stuff in them. In the kitchen they create smell and are a mess and are simply under foot.
So philosophical issues aside , what is the practical solution?
I will not use these bl**dy things if they continue to be inconvenient and generally in my way. Thats a FACT.
As for the earth - well as my husbands father used to say "It'll last my lifetime" ( and no I dont have any children to worry about. Let them take care of their own problems anyway!)
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Exactly. My local council (Canterbury) used to have a schme where you had a green wheelie bin for recycling, and a grey one for everything else. Most rooms in the house were given two wate baskets, one for each, and it all worked well.
They abruptly removed this system and moved to plastic bags. These blow around when put out (and have to be put out the night before). There's also nowhere to jkeep them in the house, and having a part-filled bag kying around is just silly.
It all goes in the grey bin now.
--
Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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writes:

in
into
necessary
encourage
them.
I can see your problem and I'm not sure what we would have done if we didn't have space outside. The way we have it (in Guildford) is that we get weekly (was fortnightly) collections and we've provided with a Green Box (realistically its just a free plastic crate with an optional lid for 1). We put tins, jars and newspaper/mags (not cardboard or general paper) into it, but into separate old Tesco bags. Makes it easy for the people putting it into the Kerbsider truck if they're already separated.
We rinse/clean all tins and jars. I think this is a requirement by GBC. This should mean that animals won't bother with them as they don't smell or contain any food. Also makes them not smell in the house.
I would possibly suggest you invest in a largish (2' by 1.5' or so) plastic crate with a lid and possibly a smaller box inside. Bung everything into the small box inside and then (when its dry) take the contents outside and separate into the separate bags the council have provided but keep in a box. This keeps the bags dry (I hate plastic bags when they're wet, they drip on you and things!) and also avoids any possibly problems with animals (which should be reduced if they've been cleaned). The box makes it all the more neater than 2 or 3 separate bags hanging outside.
The council should make it as easy as possible for people to recycle. GBC have done a great job (weekly collections, free crate (though optional lid 1) etc) and they're improving it this year with a 2nd(!!) box for cardboard/paper.
Okay, we have to rinse the tins/jars - but that isn't much work really. But its reduced the number of waste bags we put out each week. The only thing we'd like them to take is plastic - but currently that's very expensive to do because of the size to weight ratio (plastic is quite light, and has high bulk which means the can't collect too much in their trucks) - so we have to take that ourselves to their recycling station.
That's the only advice I can really give. I've no idea whether you've got much space outside though.
Hope that helps
David
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On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 12:13:23 -0000, mich wrote:

So you wash or at least rinse, things before you put them in. Though I guess if you normally use a dishwasher for the dirty plates, pans etc then running a bowl of hot water just for that is waste of energy. If you hand wash then it takes no more water just a little bit of time and if people are running to a 5 minute schedule whilst at home they really ought to learn to relax...

Bags do seem to be a bit of non-starter but are no doubt cheaper (in the short term) than providing boxes.

So don't store them in the kitchen but the garage, utility room or other suitable place. Ah Modern rabbit hutch houses no spare space...

Instead of complaining in here, send your opinion to those that are in control of the scheme. Be polite and constructive if possible of course.
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For the record, I do rinse them, thats a requirement. But they still smell of something not quite nice , especially after being in there for six weeks!
Though I

I do have a dish washer - and so I do have to clean these separately. Further, I have to be careful because if I put too much junk down the drains it will clog them and b*gger up my septic tank eventually, probably.
If

I dont have a schedule at home. Its simply as fast as possible because I wouldnt have a life otherwise. I already work more hours than I have available ( when you take out travelling time) so every minute at home is precious.

I dont have a garage or an outside utility available for this! Not everyone has a garage you know - and if I had a garage , I would want to put my car in it, not use it a Steptoes - back -yard - recyling - in - waiting -centre.
I have a shed, but its my garden shed and its full of garden stuff ( lawn mower etc) And I'll be b*ggered if I will give up my outside loo for the job. I use the loo when I am gardening. I also have a greenhouse , and that is a greenhouse, not a utility room in conversion.
I dont have a rabbit hutch house either - its a two bed bungalow but my kitchen is fully fitted and the pantry is used as a pantry. There isnt a "utility room". I do have a seperate dining room, but I am not going to eat with this rubbish round me. I do have a lounge, but I refuse to sit with refuse ( sorry about the pun) when watching TV There is room for one bin only in my kitchen.

Now there is the rub. I dont know who to. It seems they have an outside contractor doing it. Do I complain to the council who take b*gger all notice anyway like as not, or to the contractor , who will probably care even less?
rant over.
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On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 15:16:04 -0000, mich wrote:

Six weeks? Thought you said that they collected every 2... Ah I see they only take full sacks. Fing stupid! Done to reduce the cost of the bags no doubt, thats where a box scores it is reuseable and doesn't have to be full.

As this is uk.d-i-y perhaps you ought to ask about drainage systems. B-) A properly installed drain is pretty difficult to block with just ordinary kitchen waste. The normal culprits are fat, roots, nappies, female sanitary products or condoms none of which should be in a drain in the first place.

A bit more organic matter won't hurt, more food for the bugs. It will add to the sludge build up though but I doubt noticeably. Also on a septic tank.

I know the feeling, when I work it's a 60+hr week (ex travel) would be 70+ if I wanted it (I don't, 60 is *more* than enough).

Whoever is holding the purse strings, I suspect that will be the council. Re-cycling is a fairly high profile "good thing" for a council to be involved in, I would expect contact information about the scheme to be on their website, especially as it appears from your postings to be a new scheme. Is there no phone number printed on the bags?
On the whole it strikes me that the scheme has been setup to handle the volumes of waste from the 2+2 family and is not flexable enough to deal with the person living on their own(*) who lives on fresh real food and doesn't generate much waste. Forget about the scheme, either bung it all the black sack or take it to the recycling banks when you shop always assuming where you shop has some.
(*) Thats the impression your posts give, maybe incorrectly.
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encourage
them.
Materials are only acceptable for recycling if they are clean.
Rinsing the containers out takes me a only a moment and completely solves the problem of smells and vermin.
Roger
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... wastes the benefit of recycling them.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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Probably does on strict economic grounds, but as its marginal I would prefer to see as much material as possible recycled rather than wasted.
When I looked into the local can bank about 3/4 of the cans were aluminium, and at around 650 UKp a tonne scrap value (65p per kilo) I recon they are on to a good thing, especially if the contractor quoted for clearing only steel cans.
Incidently a couple of summers ago it became a nice little earner for those who had the time to go round collecting aluminium beverage cans and weighing them in.
Roger
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Why? If it doesn't work on strict economic grounds, it doesn't work on any other.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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Huge wrote:

Depends how far ahead you look - landfill tax is escalating, and new sites are becoming more expensive (as they're rarer) so costs are rising. Incineration is unpopular with those who live near the incinerators.
If you want a selfish point of view, you get more wheelie bin space (assuming you're on them) - my local council won't take anything that's not in the bin on the normal collection. Near where I work it's rationed bin bags and recycling boxes.
If it's economics you're after - economies of scale.
If you were really worried about wasting water you could rinse them in a bucket taken from the bath before emptying it, or use rainwater. I use the end of the washing up water, as ther's no room for a dishwasher.
btw I was in Japan recently, where they have real space problems. You have to sort rubbish into compostable, combustable, recyclables, etc. At least one sort is collected almost daily.
--
Chris
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Chris Hodges wrote:

We've got rationed bin bags and a green plastic box recycling scheme round here. I (single person) get exactly the same allowance of bin bags as next door (family of 2 adults + 2 kids), I barely get through a bag a week and most of that is the junk that comes through the front door and plastic bottles which they won't recycle. Our council does have a remarkable approach to recycling though, they appear to have a crack team who go around evenly distributing the contents of the green boxes all along the pavement and roadside so they don't have to pay too much to dispose of what they collect.
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James...
http://www.jameshart.co.uk /
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Quite so. And once these materials become too expensive as new, then recycling makes sense.

This is irrelevant. The landfill tax has precious little to do with the environment.
[13 lines snipped]

Jesus. Who can be arsed with that sort of nonsense?

I do recycle all kitchen waste onto the compost heap. But then, I get the benefit from that.
--
"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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"Chris Hodges" wrote | btw I was in Japan recently, where they have real space problems. | You have to sort rubbish into compostable, combustable, recyclables, | etc. At least one sort is collected almost daily.
"collected almost daily" is a very big difference from "once a fortnight"
Owain
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