Recycling - how do others cope?

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They have just started a curbside recycling system in my area and I have been delivered of a series of coloured sacks for separating out materials ( tins and cans, textiles, and newspapers). This is a complicated system because in addition I have to put all glass jars in a separate carrier ( presumably a recycled one for the supermarket. All other rubbish is still collected weekly and most folks here ( including me) use black bin sacks ( I have a dustbin outside I put this into also) Recycling bags are collected fortnightly. It is not a tub or bin system like in other places I have been.
So, how do people cope?
I currently have two half filled sacks gracing the kitchen! They are under foot and in the way! I have nowhere to store them. The kitchen is not big enough to take any extra waste bins ( I have one large pedal bin in a corner.
Any suggestions as to how I can set up a system for storing these bl**dy bags? Looking at the size and speed they are filling, each bag is likely to take at least a month to fill for me, so they have to hang around that long. I cant keep tripping over them. I am getting fed up and soon , I'll sling the SOB's out and S*D the saving the earth! Anyone solved such a problem?
( remember there are three of them and I already have a bin in the kitchen for "normal" waste, I cant think of a feasible way of having three large bin containers in my kitchen and there is no space outside either)
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This is a good scheme because most of the expense of recycling is in separating out the different sorts of materials so if the homeowner does the sorting then the whole scheme makes much more economic sense. I agree that it is easy to proliferate containers though.

I used to live in Bristol which had a presorted scheme like you. I used to have one box (crate) in the kitchen which I collected all recyclables in. Then when it was full I would decant into the various containers which were stored in the garage.
In Babergh where I live now, we seem to be proliferating wheelie bins. I suppose the powers that be think that there is more spare space here in the country. We've only been doing any recycling for about a year and our recyclables all go in one bin, unsorted at the moment, but I bet they will start asking people to sort them once the system has bedded in and everyone is used to it.
Anna
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snipped-for-privacy@kettlenet.co.uk (Anna Kettle) writes:

Only if you don't cost your time!!!!
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Huge wrote:

True, but then (a) it's time (therefore cost) neutral if you have space for seperate containers, and (b) they don't (cost time that is, though probably care as well)!
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Chris
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Not in my case. The rubbish has to be transported down 1/4 mile of drive to the nearest place they will deign to collect it in return for my 1900/year. Mind you, that's slightly better than it used to be, the nearest point used to be 1/2 mile away.
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(Anna Kettle) writes:

materials
How long does it take for you to put a tin into one box when you're finished with it? Now, imagine if you have a box full of different things and then have to separate them? Takes much longer. Then imagine you've got 5,000 boxes to do every day.
The cost of your time to put a tin into one box and a jar into another one at a time (ie. as you finish with them) is probably no longer than it would take to put into the bin. So your time hasn't probably cost anything, or minimal compared to the time it would have taken if they had to separate 5,000 boxes of things. In the end, even if the Council workers did have to separate them, you'd end up paying for it through Council Tax - probably at an increased cost than your time would have cost you. ;)
D
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There isn't space in my kitchen for such a scheme. I'm not keeping the container in the utility room, because the heat from the boiler will cause the food remains to stink, I'm not going outside with each and every tin and if you wash the tins, you've just pissed away the minimal benefit from recycling them.

Bedford council already have a stupid scheme like this.

Bearing in mind that there is no market for glass cullett in this country and it all ends up as landfill or road surfacing.
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(Anna Kettle) writes:

have
finished
Rinsing takes practically no water if you do it at the end of the washing up in the not-so-clean water. Enough to stop it smelling and makes it clean enough for recycling.

one
Evidence to back this up?
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[20 lines snipped]

I have a dishwasher.
[11 lines snipped]

Read it somewhere. Happy to be disabused of the notion.
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On Sat, 8 Nov 2003 15:10:12 UTC, "David Hearn"

But if you have a dishwasher, that not-so-clean water is inaccessible.
I don't mind recycling....but my council have made it MUCH less practical to do.
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Bob Eager
rde at tavi.co.uk
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wrote:

My sister puts the cats tins in the dishwasher (with everything else).
She seems to genuinely think that LA have changed their scheme (to lightweight plastic bags) to punish *her* for previously putting dirty things in the old recycling bin.
tim

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wrote:

washing up

clean
Much like mine, with paper collections. They issued us with green plastic boxes that weigh, when full of news papers, enough to make a healthy man wince at the weight. When the paper gets wet, when waiting for collection, what are the 'bin' men going to have to lift. I can see some of the heavier boxes getting left at the edge of the house holder's property as being too heavy for them to carry.
The whole scheme would have been better thought out by putting paper re-cycling bins on some street corners, rather that issuing each house with a small box to be put out for collection.
My local council started paper collections last year, but I have not seen any collections for well over 6 months now.
Dave
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Too be honest, that doesn't bother me much. The argument used to run "consumers will never sort their waste for recycling". Even if it currently all ends up in landfill, I'd rather that argument was void should a market open up in the future.
--
Selah

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I'm wrong, anyway. Apparently it's made into fibreglass.
Although I'm not convinced that supermarket bottle-bank cullet's much use for anything.
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"The road to Paradise is through Intercourse."
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On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 13:03:38 +0000 (UTC), Stephen Gower wrote:

And in the future somebody could dig up that nicely sorted landfill and recycle it :-)
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wrote:

This is off topic now, but has anyone thought of the terrible consequence for history if we recycled everything and put nothing into land fill?
There would be nothing for the future "Time Team" archaeologists of the 25th century to did up and tell us all about our lives <g>
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25th
That would be a big relief for the archaeologists.

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On Tue, 11 Nov 2003 21:30:40 -0000, "Mary Fisher"

And the viewers.
--

Dave

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--

"Grimly Curmudgeon" < snipped-for-privacy@nothotmail.com> wrote in message
news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com...
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And once the materials become rare and costly enough, I can see that happening. Well, I can't, because I'll have been dead for a while, but you see what I mean...
--
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The uk.transport FAQ; http://www.huge.org.uk/transport/FAQ.html
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