Recomendations for a new barn conversion....

Hi, Thought I would just plug into some of the knowledge in this group..... We are in the process (Only preliminary planning tho) of a barn conversion and was wondering if anyone has any ideas of good technologies/designs to start with, i.e I'm interested in this new boiler which is meant to generate its own elec, and we are looking at installing a reed bed for sewage treatment. But what do you think? Is it worth installing networking cable, speaker cable? etc what would be the best heating UF or normal Rads, bearing in mind its a brick skirt with wooden top, also any ideas on good double glazing as we are having a lot of glass on the front.
Cheers, obviously we are having an architect but thought I would look in to a few of the techs available. Oli
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We
and
start
treatment.
mind
as
to
Oli
There is a mailing list just for selfbuilders like you. So, join that. http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/ It is called UK_selfbuild
The Stirling engine boilers: One is out about now, the Whispergen http://www.whispergen.nz and the other, the MicroGen is out next year http://www.microgendirect.com /
Network cable: Yes, however it may be redundant quite quickly as wireless technology takes hold.
Heating? An open question really. If you are having Heat Recovery Ventilation, then go forced air throughout using the same uprated ventilation ducting, heating the ductwork via a copper coil heater battery in the ductwork via a wet boiler. UFH is good for large areas, like churches, as the heat comes from under you. May fit the bill. Insulate the place as much as possible as barns are famous for running away with heating bills. Have a "warm roof" that is superinsulated.
Concentrate on making the fabric air tight, reducing, or eliminating, cold bridges and insulating as much as possible, to superinsulation levels if possible. Go well over any building regs. Then heating may be a partial background system.
Glazing? Go triple low "e".
Good luck.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.538 / Virus Database: 333 - Release Date: 10/11/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cheers for the notes...

group.....
its
the
heating
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you do, install a Klargester Biodisc instead of a standard septic tank. Then you might not even need the reed bed, but you'll be doing the environment some extra good if you do install them. You'll probably get consent to discharge into watercourses with such a set up and only need jetting every 12 months.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
cheers the purpose of the reedbed was so we could discharge into a large pond we have which doesnt have a water supply to it. Jetting every 12 months seems alot... i seem to remember at our last house we had a standard septic tank and that hardly ever got emptied..

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

months
septic
A modern properly functioning septic tank will probably need emptying every couple of years. A mini treatment plant will require de-sludging and servicing annually. The advantage is that it will produce a much lower level of pollution than a septic tank. In many cases you will not be permitted to install a septic tank without some form of post treatment. You really need to research the various systems and take account of local ground conditions. It is certainly worth talking to your local building control department or the Environment Agency who should have knowledge of local conditions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The 12 months is a recommendation (which stand for septic tanks too, AIUI). It will work without it. It is basically a superior design of septic tank using rotating discs with much better resistance to chemicals. It maintains bacterial action under much harsher conditions. Its discharges are suitable for putting into watercourses even before tertiary treatment by reed beds. I'd recommend taking a look at their website.
www.klargester.co.uk
You may find your building control department insist on one anyway.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Christian McArdle wrote:

They do these days unless your soil is very absorbent.
I must say mine has been faultless.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 17:37:54 -0000, a particular chimpanzee named
the keyboard and produced:

Not Building Control per se, but IIRC the Environment Agency would require a treatment plant (as opposed to a septic tank) if you were discharging within 500m of a borehole or reservoir.
--
Hugo Nebula
"You know, I'd rather see this on TV,
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Question Asker wrote:

Been using our biodisc for two years now. Haven't touched it. No smell at all. Probably a bit better than a reed bed, but does the same job.
I am running roof rainwater via a separate private sewer into the pond. If you decide to do the same (recommended) get the pipework in early..its makes a blasted mess of the lawns.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The Question Asker wrote:

I think that you are brave to go for that. Tried and tested menas the trades know how to do it, and teh building isnpector won't hesitate to pass it...but don't let it stop you - just be aware of teh teeth sufking and extra expense..

In my opinion totally 100% yes, and SKADS of it everywhere. You can always leave bits lying in teh walls - termination is expensive, cable is cheap, especially before you line it.

Underfloor if you can get it into the screed, especially with all that glass. No matter how good the DG is, its always colder than your lovely insulated walls are going to be, and air will still cool against the glass and drift down to bare foot level. Having a warm floor will transform the feel.
Upstairs its not so easy a cvhoice. UF is more difficult to install in he upper floors, espceailly if you have a celing less than an inch thick as I do (exposed beams)And you will want hot towel rails i teh bathrooms etc, and prtobaly a nice warm cupbioard to air clothes in - so those will be more conventional rads/rails etc.
I have UF heating in a corridoor downstairs leading to a stairwell - and it has proved to be uneccesary to gheat the landing at all. Plenty of heat rises to teh upper levels, so if ou have a mezzanine gallery type construction, you may not need to heat it upstairs at all - just double up on teh UF at ground floor lelevl.

Never used the stuff. I believe triple galzed is teh best, and argon filled. Its still cold relative to walls. We single glazed our much smaller windows, and with thermally lined curtains and proper draught sealing, they don't lose as much heat as a no curtain DG unit would.

G'luck mate!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

group..... We

and
start
its
treatment.
If it is approved the BCO can suck his teeth out, he has to pass it. far too many of these goons force their own opioions on peopel, like having cavity walls. The MicroGen is not technology that is not understood. The electricity producing Stirling unit is hermetically sealed, like a fridge compressor, the rest is common technology. They would mainly be using off-the-shelf components anyhow.

If having a heat recovery & vent unit (recommended as the hosue always has a nice fesh feel and smell to it), then forced air to boost it along.

to
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.538 / Virus Database: 333 - Release Date: 10/11/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
IMM wrote:

The BCO can do what he likes, and your only recourse is a long and expensive appeal.
I had tio get a not overly expensive complete heat loss calculation done on teh house before I was allowed to use e.g. single glazed windows. Without that the inspectir would not have been able to determine that the whole house met energy conservation requirements.
My heating system is 'interesting' to say the least. The plumber just didn't believe it would work. It does.
None of these are insuperable problems, but they are all issues that have to be dealt with, and take extra time and money because of it.
As far as your comments like 'XXX is understood technology' goes, that is a very por statement. Understood by WHOM. You? The scientific community? The BCO? The plumber?
My plumber didn't even understand pressure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

far
The
fridge
As long as its within the building regulations. If he rejects something out of pure opinion, because he is not familiar with it, then he can be in big trouble. Some people have gone ahead, with independent surveyors reports and photo evidence, and it did not cost them a lot. You can always go over his head if he is uncooperative and supply the details.

Sensible.
Heath Robinson eh.

If the appliance is CE approved, etc, no one can stop you installing it. Certainly no BCO who lives in the 1950s.

You mean the man who pretended to be a plumber.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.538 / Virus Database: 333 - Release Date: 10/11/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
IMM wrote:

No, his name was 'dave' I believe.

Ah, it WAS you wasn't it?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There are piles of jobs that are best to do when you have an empty shell, don't skimp on fitting cables, or plumbing, drains it will be MUCH more work later.
I used a package sewage treatment unit, very good, very easy to install, no problems to run.
UF heating or rads, I would do UF, for one reason "no rads", but I would not put UF into a wooden floor (upstairs).
I am slowly DIY'ing a barn conversion, with experts when I need them. I am spending extra to get top quality on the bits that are going to be there for 50- 100 years (or more). If I screw up someting fundamentsl its going to cost so much to repair. If I have a cheep carpet, repair is only the cost of a new carpet.
I would suggest you spend a good ammout of time on getting the design / layout right, the last thing you want is to get to the end and wish the rooms where in different places.
Rick
On Thu, 13 Nov 2003 15:05:08 -0000, "The Question Asker"

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is true. You can install extra pipes and cable and just leave them terminated for future use. Extra drains is a good idea, as putting these in later is real expensive pain.
--
--

Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
Version: 6.0.538 / Virus Database: 333 - Release Date: 10/11/2003
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.