Re: Wiring into a doenstairs toilet.



What particular risk is there if an (electrical) appliance is dropped into the sink?
It's a bit like the classic horror/crime film where the baddie threatens to throw an electric fire into the bath - in my opinion the thrower of the fire is much more likely to be electrocuted than someone in the bath.
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Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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On 3 Jul 2003 10:57:13 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@isbd.co.uk wrote:

I'm guessing.
Presumably the moist human body might be a better conductor than direct water - we are after all referred to as "carbon life forms", and as far as I can recall carbon is a good conductor.
To be perfectly honest I'm in no hurry to test this theory.
Andrew
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If the sink is metal and earthed, wouldn't the electricity take the easiest route to earth?

Absolutely. Mind you, I've often thought the idea of having a near perfect earth in the shape of a metal sink near to anything electrical you can touch at the same time slightly suspect. This is the *last* thing you do with a workbench where electrical equipment is tested etc.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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<snip>

<snip>
That's highly flawed reasoning....
Carbon may well be a conductor in it's elemental form, but not in the majority of it's compounds.
Polythene, nylon, etc spring to mind.
We do conduct electricity, but certainly not for the reason that you mention.
cheers Richard
-- Richard Sampson
email me at richard at olifant d-ot co do-t uk
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?? It's not the carbon in our bodies that makes them (rather poorly) conductive, it's the water. The addition of water to our skin just makes better (electrical) contact between ourselves and whatever we're touching.
But I *still* don't see how this relates to the danger of dropping an electrical appliance in the sink. Unless you keep hold of it as it drops in the water, and even then it doesn't seem to be a particularly dangerous thing to do.
--
Chris Green ( snipped-for-privacy@x-1.net)

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People should stop worrying about it. Just install an RCD and there won't be a problem. It's unlikely to be a problem anyway. A quick jolt followed by "duh, that was a stupid thing to do".
Christian.
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be
Don't know about you, but the majority of homes i used to work in still had replaceable wire type fuses. I am still not going to test the theory, OR trust others who have passed before me's work with my health. As was stated earlier in this thread, there is a question whether or not to bond sinks, I wouldn't want to risk coming across the plumber who'd made the decision not to bond and have the chance of having mains electricity deciding to earth through my body, you are welcome to try though christian, but it would be a stupid thing to do and anyone that doubts that is welcome to try ;-)
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give it a go and let me know how it feels
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