Re: Still on about cutting curves in tiles :-(



(but the sheds sell similar tools) will do nicely.
Make sure that you support the tile well when you cut it - e.g. on a workmate with the jaws slightly open, and use the saw in the gap so that the tiles is supported on both sides of the cut.
Roger
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On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 15:39:21 +0100, "David W.E. Roberts"

Naah. Round hacksaw blade will be fine, particularly for a one-off. It's a bit slow, but inexpensive, accurate, and you won't need eye, ear, nose-throat-mouth and hand protection.
Thomas Prufer
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Yep I've done that- a few times.
What I did was cut in towards the curve to create little 'fingers' of tile, which were easily snapped off. Then I carefully worked around the curve, moving the tile across the blade. did a neat job as long as I took time and didn't rush it.
These are dead handy tools for tiling, esp. for fiddly cuts like this, for diagonal cuts and for cutting thin strips from tiles. You can pick then up for less than GBP 50 now as well.
Though for a one off one of the round tilesaw blades will do the job I'm sure, jus ta bit slow.
--
Chris French, Leeds

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chris French wrote:

All the time.

Yup. Fine file or coarse emery of its a 'show curve'

Yep. Hired one for 4 weeks for about 60 squids it was all busted up too.
Then got one for 50!! Tiles aren't all it cuts either - floor slates as well, and even 1/2" marble, and provbably metal sheet tho I haven't tried that yet.

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TA - yet another parameter changes in the decision matrix :-)
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The new PP Pro trim cutter is a substantial powerful tool.

Focus have a trim cutter for 50 with a circle cutter and router base (same as the old 550w PP Pro unit). Also under the DPTools label the same unit is in Focus with one 14.4 1 hr charger battery drill, for 40. The bits are available from B&Q and Focus.
0 for the Rotozip is great value but you don't have the circle cutter (15 extra) and it is discontinued. I prefer to pay the extra 10 and get a free drill.
--
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IMM wrote:

The circle cutter, straight guide, and 10-piece bit set are also available from Argos - but only in their Argos Extra stores.

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"parish" <parish_AT_ntlworld.com> wrote in message

At 15 each as they used to be?
What is an "extra" store?
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IMM wrote:

Circle cutter 15.99 Straight guide 12.99 10-pce bit set 19.99

They are a kind of Argos superstore with 33% more products than regular Argos stores. There's 11 of them around the country and a further 15 that you can order stuff in the Extra catalogue from.
Our local Argos is one of those you can order Extra stuff from so the catalogues they have are Argos Extra.
I've scanned the page about Extra stores from the catalogue so you can see if there is one near you:
http://www.parish.nildram.co.uk/argos.png

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parish wrote:

And here's the page with the Rotozip stuff:
http://www.parish.nildram.co.uk/rotozip.png
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IMM burbled as usual, amongst other things:

Put me down for a hundred.

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I have just completed a large tiled curved area. I used an electric tile cutter that i found on special offer at a diy store.
I marked out the curve on the wall using an anchoring nail, string and a pencil.
I then marked out a section of curve on stiff (ish) tracing paper and cut it to give me a template.
I offered up each tile to its place, marked each side where the curve would be and used the paper template and a permanent marker to mark the curve across the tile.
Using the tile cutter with the guard up (obviously take care) I cut tangents across the curve until it was more or less right and then smoothed the curve with coarse emery paper.
To put an nice finish on the final curved tiled area, i edged it with mosaic tiles. The final result looks pretty good.
Good luck John
On Sat, 26 Jul 2003 15:39:21 +0100, "David W.E. Roberts"

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The easier - although longer - way is to cut radii as close together as you can be bothered to right up to the line, then snap off the 'fingers'.
For most tiles about 1/2" between cuts will be fine.
The curve will be as good as the number of cuts as obviously they will be near straight lines between each cut when you snap off the bits. And a half round tile file will finish the job if necessary.
--
*Why is a boxing ring square?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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