Re: Power Shower Pumps

Justin wrote:

I recently bought the cheap 1.5 bar one from Screwfix, and that's more than adequate for us.
www.screwfix.com/app/sfd/cat/pro.jsp?id1893&ts446
Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It should be just fine with 15mm. Don't reuse the 22mm HWC feed. You are relying on this to give excellent flow, so you don't suck out the vent pipe. If this does happen anyway, you'll need to install a flange on the cylinder. 15mm has the advantage that the hot water will come through sooner.

cope with mains pressure water, often over 6 bar. A pump will not trouble them.

Absolutely fine.

You may need a flange. It will be much easier to install without and only insert one if problems are found in testing. If you have a short run of 22mm pipe from a tank directly above the cylinder without excessive elbows, or bore reducing valves, you will probably be OK.
Christian.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

a
I
pipe.
cylinder.
The output from the HWC is 22mm, rises gradually at a shallow angle and then T's into the open vent, which drops down to the bottom of the HWC at floor level. I can easily T into the 22mm hot supply at floor level before it drops down to 15mm, Will it be ok to T off with 15mm pipe and use the cold supply which is 15mm, will the differential in the initial pipe diameters cause any problems ?

often over 6 bar. A pump will not trouble

obviously
similar
22mm
The cold tank is above approx 6' above the top of the HWC, probably a couple og elbows in the feed

I've also discovered one of the hot 15mm pipes in the airing cupboard only supplies the shower so I can boost only the shower rather then all the hot supplies.
--
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com ).
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I've recently installed a QTech 2.3-bar twin-ended pump in precisely the same location, and am using it to supply all the hot water outlets in the house. The flow from the kitchen tap is excellent (long run of 15mm and a continental narrow-bore tap).
(Snip)

I disconnected the hot supply to the washing machine as I didn't want the pump starting every time the WM called for water. In any case, unless I drew off a lot of water before turning on the machine, no hot water actually made it to the machine before the inlet valves slammed shut.

The burb that came with my pump said that if there were *more* than 3 single-use (i.e. non-mixer, or mixers connected to hot pumped and cold mains) taps on the network a by-pass kit should be fitted. This consists of a bit of bridging pipework connecting both ends of the pump so that when only one end is working, there's a small flow being pumped from the other. I have 3 single-use outlets so didn't fit (or make) the kit.

The blurb with my pump said only use a Warix or Essex flange (not a Surrey) as the Surrey could lead to starvation at the pump. My plumbers' mechant thinks that's a load of old tosh, and didn't have any Essexes anyway. So I bought a Surrey and fitted that. I also added a supplementary 15mm feed from the cold tank to the pump's hot inlet which should cancel out any restriction caused by the use of the Surrey flange. The main purpose was to blend the HW down to <70c, the max operating temperature of the pump. I bunged in a check valve too, to stop the hot water rising by convection back up to the cold tank.
Hope whatever solution you choose works. I would have installed an unvented cylinder but we have the prospect of buildings inspectors poking around when our extension goes up, so that's on hold for a bit.
Cheers,
Derrick.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.