Re: Power planes



Excellent devices. Take skill to use, though, or you'll end up with a non square edge.

Dunno. Mine's a B&D about 10 years+ old.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:
Hello Huge

Whizzy things, and great for removing fingerprints.

Don't know them, but I've got one of the Ppro B&Q cheapies (25 a year or so ago, doubtless cheaper now) and it's fine. Not really suited for fine detail, but it does a fair job. Planed several hundred mahogany parquet bricks with it.
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snipped-for-privacy@digdilem.org (Simon Avery) wrote in message (Huge) wrote:

We've got an el-cheapo from Argos (Challenge), which includes a spare blade and a setting jig for re-sharpening. It's been really usefull for trimming doors, although you need to watch for staples/nails!
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You must be *very* lucky in the fit of old doors in your place. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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On 4 Aug 2003 11:42:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@ukmisc.org.uk (Huge) wrote:

Ah yes, but these planers are real timesavers - you get the non-square edge quicker. ;)
I moved into a new house a few years back, doors were rubbing on the carpets. So I took the doors outside to give them a dose of the electric planer. Worked a treat. Only problem was the fscking doors had fscking staples along the bottome edge - took lumps out of the TCT planer blades.
No real harm done because the blades are easily replaced, but annoying.
Andrew
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Andrew McKay wrote:

The person who lived here before me laid a new thicker carpet in the back bedroom and landing and took the doors off to plane the bottoms to fit, trouble was he did the wrong door so the bathroom's got nearly an inch of clearance and the back bedroom needs a good shove just te get it to move through the pile. I would change the doors, there's only 3 of them in total but I'm a lazy sod so I'm living with it for the time being.
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Huge wrote in message ...

which
For trimming doors a circular saw is quicker, easier, and more accurate.
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I'd agree if you have to take a chunk off.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@argonet.co.uk London SW 12
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Roger Mills wrote in message ...

some
Have to disagree there. You can do tapered cuts on the long edge of a door starting at zero and ending at 1mm if you wish. All you need is a batten, a couple of clamps or panel pins, and a scrap of harboard cut to the distance from the blade to the left hand edge of the saw base. Mark the beginning and the end of cut, lay the harboard down, slide the batten up to it, fix, and cut. It's always dead square and impossible to take too much off. Not so easy of course if you're working on the landing of a third floor conversion flat but turning out decent work in a confined space is what chippies get paid for. My power plane is permanently set to just above zero and only used to smooth an existing surface. Never seen them as an efficient method of stock removal.
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On Mon, 4 Aug 2003 13:03:58 +0100, "Roger Mills"

I finally became "someone" " ;O) This job is intimidatingly on my horizon! Thanks for the ideas - I got some other complications, but this is going to help for sure!
Take Care, Gnube {too thick for linux}
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Of course, I didn't mean to the bottom of the door, I meant clamped to the sides of the door, set flush to the bottom.
i.e.
| | | | | Door | | | +| |+ || || <-- Batten || || ++-------++
This way, the batten gets splintered at the end rather than the door. Obviously a skilled craftsman will be able to use the plane directly, which is why I use the battens.
Christian.
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